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31 results for Education--Finance
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Record #:
263
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Abstract:
Although the state provides \"foundation\" funding to all county school systems, per-pupil spending varies by as much as 60% due to local appropriations.
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North Carolina Insight (NoCar JK 4101 N3x), Vol. 7 Issue 1, June 1984, p30-37, il, bibl, f Periodical Website
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Record #:
768
Author(s):
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Two laws exist to aid schools with relatively low property tax bases and enrollments: the Low-Wealth Supplemental Funding Program and the Small-Schools Supplemental Funding Program.
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School Law Bulletin (NoCar K 23 C33), Vol. 23 Issue 2, Spring 1992, p1-14, il, bibl, f
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Record #:
1665
Author(s):
Abstract:
In May, 1994, the school boards in Halifax, Robeson, Cumberland, Vance, and Hoke Counties sued North Carolina, charging that the state's system of financing public schools does not foster uniform opportunity, as the state constitution requires.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 12 Issue 24, June 1994, p10-13, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
2112
Author(s):
Abstract:
Goals 2000, the national Educate America Act, was passed in 1994. States can receive funds for schools for their participation; however, the Gun Free Schools Act section conflicts with two North Carolina statute provisions.
Source:
School Law Bulletin (NoCar K 23 C33), Vol. 25 Issue 4, Fall 1994, p15-27, f
Record #:
2327
Author(s):
Abstract:
With over 20,000 new students entering the state's schools systems each year for the next decade, school personnel, local officials, and state legislators are challenged by two issues: the critical need for new school buildings and how to pay for them.
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Record #:
2513
Abstract:
In May, 1994, the school boards of Cumberland, Halifax, Hoke, Robeson, and Vance Counties filed a lawsuit against the state, charging failure to provide sufficient funding to educate their students.
Source:
North Carolina Law Review (NoCar K14 0694), Vol. 73 Issue 6, Sept 1995, p2123-2188, f
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Record #:
3439
Abstract:
While the state has the responsibility to provide a general and uniform free public school system and local government to provide financial support, school units are not equal because of inadequate and inequitable funding.
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Record #:
4383
Author(s):
Abstract:
Section 115C-431 of the North Carolina General Statutes lays out the procedure for resolving a dispute between a local board of education's request for more operating funds than the local county commissioners are willing to meet. Powell discusses the law's development from the pre-1920 statutes, through the statutes of 1923, 1955, 1975, 1989, 1996, and 1997.
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Record #:
4380
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In 1997, the North Carolina General Assembly revised General Statute 115C-431, the law governing budget disputes between local boards of education and county commissioners. The use of mediation procedures was adopted. Stephens and Michel discuss and analyze this process in handling school funding disputes in Lee, Pamlico, and Wake Counties in 1997.
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Record #:
4474
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With population growth outstripping their budgets, some school systems are trying new ways to raise money. Rowan and Burke counties have contracted with Coca-Cola and Pepsi respectively for exclusive rights to sell their products in the schools. The schools get needed funds for items like textbooks, scoreboards, and computers. Some school personnel question the commercialization, possible influence on curriculums by companies, and competition with the food service program.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 58 Issue 2, Feb 2000, p8-9, il
Record #:
5196
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Guilford County School Board challenged the Guilford County Commissioners over the amount of funding for the school system, because it was below the school board's request. The dispute was settled August 4, 2000. Wilson discusses what other school boards with similar disputes can learn from Guilford County's experience.
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School Law Bulletin (NoCar K 23 C33), Vol. 32 Issue 2, Spring 2001, p1-10, il
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Record #:
5480
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 1994, a group of poor school districts filed a lawsuit against the state, charging failure to provide sufficient funding to educate their students. The North Carolina Supreme Court's ruling recognized that under the state constitution children have a right to a \"sound basic education.\" Coll examines three extensive superior court rulings on this right and how the state's educational future might be affected by them.
Source:
School Law Bulletin (NoCar K 23 C33), Vol. 32 Issue 3, Summer 2001, p1-21, il, f
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Record #:
5614
Author(s):
Abstract:
Comparative statistics regarding teacher salaries and other educational expenditures in North Carolina are charted and presented by the North Carolina Association of Educators.
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NCAE News Bulletin (NoCar Oversize L 11 N822x), Vol. 24 Issue 7, June 1994, psupplement1-4 Periodical Website
Record #:
12708
Author(s):
Abstract:
A \"quality education\"Â┬Łas promised by appropriations increased in 1961 is coming to public schools, and the result is palpable. A survey conducted by the author represents visits to 100 school systems in North Carolina, and interviews with school officials. Some of the improvements include smaller teacher loads, recruitment of better teachers, and enrichment of school programs.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 29 Issue 22, Mar 1962, p7-8, 18, por
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Record #:
18836
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Abstract:
The state's financial aid largely focused on students entering traditional four-year programs with less emphasis on those individuals entering community colleges. The author offers a statistical breakdown for the number of community college students and aid received. Sources for this funding is also explored, showing that much of the community college students receive federal funding and less state funding. Six sources of state funding are highlighted and the author encourages development of such programs like the Need-Based Teaching and Nursing Grant Program and how to enhance these for community college students.
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