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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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10 results for Homeless persons--Services for
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Record #:
866
Author(s):
Abstract:
A pilot employment program in Raleigh is employing fifteen homeless persons.
Source:
Southern City (NoCar Oversize JS 39 S6), Vol. 42 Issue 10, Oct 1992, p4, il
Record #:
23989
Abstract:
As part of Asheville and Buncombe County's 10-year plan to end homelessness, a local nonprofit organization called Homeward Bound works with Asheville-Buncombe Homeless Initiative to provide housing and support to the chronically homeless.
Record #:
24797
Author(s):
Abstract:
In May 2011, the Inter-Faith Council (IFC) for Social Service in Chapel Hill proposed moving their existing men’s homeless shelter to a different neighborhood. However, residents protested the move, and as a result, men who need the IFC Community House’s services must be picked up at the old shelter. The small amount of space available for emergency drop-ins also presents problems for the shelter, especially with the cooler temperatures in early 2016.
Source:
Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 33 Issue 4, January 2016, p8-9, il, por Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
28176
Author(s):
Abstract:
Halfway through Raleigh’s 10-year plan to end homelessness, little has been done to solve the problem. The various agencies in the city who help the homeless say the problem is the lack of affordable housing, but little has been done to solve the housing issue. Joe Donovan, Gary Smith, and Dan Schooley have their stories of homelessness described, their inability to find jobs, and how they live without a permanent home.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 25 Issue 48, November 2008, p8 Periodical Website
Record #:
28246
Author(s):
Abstract:
Former homeless man Mike Kelly recently graduated from Housing for New Hope’s PATH Program. The Durham resident is now working and just moved into his own apartment. Through several brief stories making up an essay, Kelly talks about his stay at Phoenix House transitional housing, beating addictions, his new life, and his old friends. He also discusses why many homeless individuals fear the “system” and how it is sometimes easier to stay homeless.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 24 Issue 18, May 2007, p14-15 Periodical Website
Record #:
34443
Author(s):
Abstract:
Charles Robinson, a native of west Charlotte, is helping the community by opening shelters for the homeless and mentoring through Team TruBlue, an organization that works with children in schools. Robinson has cultivated a grassroots network to respond to community crises, violence and crimes.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
36571
Author(s):
Abstract:
A substance abuse counselor had a dream about creating a house offering a place for recovering from substance abuse. The dream made a reality in 1995 serves recovering women who are either pregnant or caring for a child under the age of five. Also offering a place to successfully transition into society, it fulfills this mission through teaching skills in recovery, parenting, and independent living. Helping also with their transition are individual and group counseling, self-care groups, case management, and crisis intervention.
Record #:
36570
Author(s):
Abstract:
Inspired by the Peanuts comic strip’s character and his trademark blanket, a nonprofit organization started in Denver in 1998 to offer blankets for children experiencing critical illnesses, accidents, homelessness, abuse, neglect, school shootings, and natural disasters. Known as “blanketeers,” Asheville’s local chapter of Linus creates blankets for children with autism, as well as children experiencing anxiety, stress, and insomnia.
Record #:
36551
Author(s):
Abstract:
At this nonprofit organization, those otherwise classified as living on the fringes of society can find themselves treated as part of the community. Services offered by BeLoved to help generate this perception include assistance with completing job applications; transitional housing for vulnerable populations; food access; children’s enrichment programs; supporting the Rise Up Studio artists collective; and collaborating in homeless rights projects and campaigns.
Record #:
36257
Author(s):
Abstract:
A Charlotte-based program assisting the city’s homeless provided its recipients a second chance for a better quality life. Assisting Urban Ministry Center with its mission to help end homelessness were services such as temporary housing during the winter at local churches. Information about the program included the individuals for whom the facility is named, John and Pat Moore. This information also cited the inspiration for Urban Ministry Center’s founding, Denver Moore, a formerly homeless individual who wrote a book about his experience.