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16 results for Charlotte--Businesses
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Record #:
24404
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Interstate Securities Inc., a Charlotte-based securities brokerage, was founded in 1932 and run the same way until Craig Redwine became president and decided to shake things up by having a say in every aspect of how the company is run. This article discusses what the business is going through after Redwine’s changes.
Record #:
24897
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A war of sorts has begun in Charlotte between John Hatcher and the Thirsty Beaver Saloon. Hatcher wants to develop the land the saloon sits on and has cut off parking to the building to force the saloon out of business. Regulars at the saloon are less than thrilled about this move and are openly protesting Hatcher’s actions.
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Record #:
24927
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Cottage Chic, a local boutique in Dilworth, has celebrated its 10th year in business. The shop offers a variety of items from clothing to luxury bath products.
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Record #:
29174
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Charlotte, North Carolina, one of the largest cities in the Carolinas, has long been a center for business relationships, trade and commerce, and product development. But now, Charlotte is taking things international as well, conducting various business ventures with countries around the world.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 49 Issue 2, Feb 1991, pA4-A6, A22, A24, A26, A28, A30, por
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Record #:
29175
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The heart of Charlotte, North Carolina, and Mecklenburg County, is uptown which serves not only as the city's business district but the center of government, culture, and entertainment.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 49 Issue 2, Feb 1991, pA8-A10, por
Record #:
31465
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Small store holds out for four decades in a rapidly changing neighborhood. Hall’s Clock Shop is only open for a few hours three days a week, but still gets enough business in those few hours to keep the father and son staff busy for the rest of the week.
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Record #:
34433
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The Charlotte Regional Partnership has branded itself as “Charlotte USA.” The partnership’s intent is to connect companies and their job opportunities to the workforces in towns with their own distinct economies but still within the Charlotte area. While the partnership says it successfully bid and recruited twelve economic development projects in 2017, some officials wonder if the partnership is as effective as it could be, especially in light of a high-profile failure in January.
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Record #:
34436
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John Herbert Caudle discovered raw honey as a way to cope with the effects of his cancer treatments. Caudle’s business, Herb’s Honey, produces raw honey, which is not heated or mixed with corn syrup, like most processed honeys are. Caudle became interested in beekeeping after learning about raw honey’s health benefits, including wound treatment, allergy and sore throat relief, and skin-clearing properties.
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Record #:
34846
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Punch bowls have been a staple for parties in the South since the 17th century. While punch has its roots in British-held India, it made its way to the United States where it became the trend for militia meetings and high society gatherings. Historically, punch was much more alcoholic and less sweet than the punch known today- and now, can be sampled at The Punch Room in Charlotte.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 86 Issue 7, December 2018, p176-178, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
35443
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Architect Kevin Kelley and developer Tony Pressley offered a historical area of Charlotte a gift whose value can’t be measured in credit card terminal swipes. Their labor of love, South End, was completed on a tight budget and in a smaller than expected square footage amount. Its popularity proved that less can be more.
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Record #:
36241
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Contemporary promotional efforts taken by the hospitality industry entail lodgings that are “a home away from home,” and where visitors feel like locals. For example, Aloft Asheville’s has fostered dogs on site for guests’ comfort. Charlotte’s Marriott Guest Center’s effort to instill convenience has a technological angle, with guests checking in through their mobile devices.
Record #:
36289
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A Sealed Air executive believed housekeeping employees, often on the bottom rung of an organization’s ladder, should have the way cleared to climb to the top. How she helped these employees receive due attention for their contribution was working to increase their career and educational opportunities.
Record #:
36301
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An educational software and e-textbook company has proven to be a maven for North Carolina’s current educational system. Promoting Discovery Educations’ endeavor is a discussion of receptivity already found among today’s students and growing receptivity among educators for their products.
Record #:
36312
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FLS Energy, a solar energy company, joined the ranks of other privately owned businesses with bright economic and occupational futures in North Carolina. Among the other 99 companies highlighted were Ennis-Flint, Rodgers Builders, Camco, Hissho Sushi, and Allen Industries. Factors these businesses often held in common included employees retaining majority ownership, being family owned, and starting with a single product.
Record #:
36447
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Millennials have proven themselves marketing mavens through their use of web-based promotional tools. Members of NetGen experiencing a business boom through social media and blogging included PR company owner Corri Smith, hairstylist McKenna Bleu, and wedding photographer Brian Schindler.