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26 results for Donsky, Martin
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Record #:
13681
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In 1967 Ralph Ketner's supermarket chain of sixteen stores had dropped to seven and his profits totaled only $36,000. He was not certain he would be in business the following year. Yet he did not go under. Now, in 1990, at age 70, he is retiring as chairman of the board of the country's fastest-growing supermarket chain - Food Lion, which had sales of $4.7 billion in 1989. Donsky discusses the remarkable turnaround.
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Record #:
13682
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Business North Carolina magazine presents its annual listing of the state's top fifty public companies. The magazine began its rankings in 1982. Companies are ranked by their fiscal-year sales. Food Lion (Salisbury), Lowe's (North Wilkesboro), and Rose's Stores (Henderson) retained their first, second and third rankings from the previous year.
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Business North Carolina (NoCar HF 5001 B8x), Vol. 10 Issue 5, May 1990, p16-18, 20-22, 24-29, il Periodical Website
Record #:
13684
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Donsky describes how Leslie (Les) H. Garner, Jr. became president of North Carolina Wesleyan College.
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Record #:
15592
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Donsky profiles Roger Soles, who has worked for Jefferson-Pilot Corp., of Greensboro, one of the Southeast's dominant insurers, for forty years. He was named chairman and chief executive officer in 1967.
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Business North Carolina (NoCar HF 5001 B8x), Vol. 7 Issue 12, Dec 1987, p16-20, 22-23, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
15608
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Wallace J. Conner is president and chairman of the board of Conner Homes Corporation of Newport, a company he began in 1959 with a single mobile home lot in Havelock. In 1964, he began manufacturing mobile homes from a plant in Newport and began building the company is a nationally-recognized leader in the mobile home industry. The company made $7 million in 1985, yet over the next eighteen months it lost $40 million. Donsky discusses how the country's fastest growing company in the mobile home industry stumbled and fell.
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Record #:
15692
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BUSINESS NORTH CAROLINA magazine's annual ranking of the state's top fifty public companies reveals that the list has undergone its most extensive shakeup since the listings began in 1982. Last year's top three companies were RJR Nabisco, Burlington Industries, and Food Lion. This year Food Lion takes over the top ranking with Lowe's and Fieldcrest Cannon taking over the second and third positions.
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Record #:
15690
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Donsky discusses how traffic congestion is affecting North Carolina, such as the state's high reputation for quality of life, whether companies considering relocation to the state will come, and what the economy will allow the state and major cities to do to alleviate the situation. North Carolina now ranks as the tenth most populous state, and growth continues.
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Business North Carolina (NoCar HF 5001 B8x), Vol. 8 Issue 5, May 1988, p46-49, 53, 55-57, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
15699
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Donsky discusses the operation of short line railroads in the state. Short lines are small or mid-size companies that operate over short distances, for example, forty-seven miles, as compared to a national company having thousands of miles of track. The NC Department of Transportation lists nine short lines in the state with the oldest being the Aberdeen & Rockfish Railroad, founded in 1892.
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Business North Carolina (NoCar HF 5001 B8x), Vol. 8 Issue 6, June 1988, p20-25, 27-29, il, map Periodical Website
Record #:
16247
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Oliver is agriculture adviser to Governor James Martin and agribusiness specialist to the N.C. Department of Commerce. He can walk the walk--he is a farmer and runs a 200-year-old 200-acre Robeson County farm. He is a big promoter of the agribusiness in the state where tobacco, cotton, and peanuts are large crops. He feels as these crops decline farmers should shift to crops like shitake mushrooms, kenaf, and herbs as niche crops. For example, the country imports over $1 billion in herbs, which he would make a nine \"cottage industry\" in the state.
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Record #:
16246
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Carl Scheer is president and general manager of the Charlotte Hornets, an NBA team. Donsky discusses with him what these positions entail and what the stress level is. Among his previous positions were assistant to the NBA Commissioner, four years with the old Carolina Cougars, and ten years with the Denver Nuggets.
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Business North Carolina (NoCar HF 5001 B8x), Vol. 9 Issue 2, Feb 1989, p24-28, 30-31, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
16245
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Hugh McColl, CEO of NCNB in Charlotte, is Business North Carolina's Mover and Shaker of the Year.
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Business North Carolina (NoCar HF 5001 B8x), Vol. 9 Issue 1, Jan 1989, p22-27, 30-33, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
16269
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Twenty-five years ago Nucor Corp. was about to go under. In 1988 the company sold over $1 billion of steel and steel products, making it the ninth largest steel manufacturer in the country and the sixth-largest publicly held company in the state. While Nucor employs 5,000 people in twenty-two plants in nine states, the corporate headquarters in Charlotte employ only seventeen. In this BUSINESS NORTH CAROLINA interview, Nucor Chairman Ken Iverson talks with Donsky about Nucor and what makes it work.
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Business North Carolina (NoCar HF 5001 B8x), Vol. 9 Issue 5, May 1989, p38-40, 42-44, 46, 48-50, por Periodical Website
Record #:
16268
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BUSINESS NORTH CAROLINA magazine's annual ranking of the state's top fifty public companies reveals that in the last eight years seventy-five companies have appeared on the list. The twenty-five that are gone were sold, moved, or taken private. Food Lion, Lowe's Co., and Rose's Stores head this year's list.
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Business North Carolina (NoCar HF 5001 B8x), Vol. 9 Issue 5, May 1989, p18-19, 22, 24-31, 34-37, il Periodical Website
Record #:
16275
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Bill Zimmer bought his first jewelry store in Wilmington in 1946 and changed the name to Reeds. By 1979 his family-owned company had grown to twenty-four stores. Nationwide there are 32,000 separately owned jewelry stores competing in a $13 billion market. Donsky describes what happened when son Alan Zimmer came into the business in the 1980s and took the company public and growing it to sixty-three stores.
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Business North Carolina (NoCar HF 5001 B8x), Vol. 9 Issue 8, Aug 1989, p52-54, 56, 58, 60, 62, 64, 66, 68, 70, por Periodical Website
Record #:
16333
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In the 1970s, when polyester clothing was all the rage, Rocky Mount-based Texfi Industries, Inc. was flying high, with good profits and shares reaching as high as $68. Then consumers moved on to other styles and Texfi lost million over the next decade; by 1984 the company was down to three plants. Donsky describes how the new chairman and CEO, Terrell Sovey, turned the company into a profitable one again.
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