NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


13 results for Floods--North Carolina, Western
Currently viewing results 1 - 13
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
4164
Abstract:
Three devastating floods struck Western North Carolina in the years 1916, 1940, and 1971. The most severe was the flood of 1916. Forty-one continuous hours of rainfall on July 15 and 16 inundated the area. Damage included nine railroad bridges swept away on the Catawba River; 895 miles of track destroyed or put out of service; and homes, factories, and fields washed away.
Source:
Record #:
5343
Author(s):
Abstract:
To many North Carolinians, the flood that followed Hurricane Floyd was \"the\" flood. However, there have been other floods, and the one in 1916 was one of the most devastating. Twenty-two inches of rain fell over the western mountains in twenty-four hours in July. Eighty people were killed, and property damages were almost $23 million.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 70 Issue 4, Sept 2002, p24-25, 27, il Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
12839
Author(s):
Abstract:
The worst flood ever to strike the mountain country of the Tar Heel state, the great flood of 1916 claimed some eighty lives and damaged approximately $22 million dollars worth of property.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 28 Issue 17, Jan 1961, p19-21, il
Full Text:
Record #:
15328
Abstract:
Major flooding affected western portions of the state after record breaking rainfall. The Dan and Yadkin River flooded towns like Elkin and many local roads were impassable. Flooded rivers affected crops and dealt significant losses to many farmers.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 5 Issue 22, Oct 1937, p13, il
Full Text:
Record #:
18718
Abstract:
The great flood of July 16, 1916 broke all records and caused death and destruction in Western North Carolina. That day twenty-two inches of rain fell over the western mountains in twenty-four hours, sending flood waters surging through Asheville, Belmont, Marshall, and other communities. Eighty people were killed, and property damages were almost $23 million.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 80 Issue 9, Feb 2013, p48-50, 52, 54-56, il Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
9500
Author(s):
Abstract:
Dean describes two devastating floods that struck western North Carolina in mid-July 1916 and in August 1940.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
26912
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Great Flood of 1916 wreaked destruction in Western North Carolina. After a recording breaking 22 inches in 24 hours, the French Broad crested at over 23 feet. Memories of the resulting devastation in Asheville, Henderson County, Rutherford County, and Gaston County, still haunt the area. Building codes and general awareness keep Western North Carolina citizens prepared for the next major storm.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
7150
Abstract:
In 2004, the mountain areas of North Carolina suffered flooding from three autumn hurricanes. While the Pigeon River and its tributaries and the Davidson River were severely affected by the flooding, most of the trout fishery in Western North Carolina escaped with minor damage.
Full Text:
Record #:
29826
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Center for Cultural Preservation presents a film documentary on the 1916 flood that devastated Asheville and Western North Carolina. The film features oral histories of survivors and tells the story of how communities were able to overcome flooding impacts and rebuild their lives.
Full Text:
Record #:
33487
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Division of Emergency Management and the National Weather Service are developing the Integrated Flood Observing and Warning System (IFLOWS), which will give residents of seventeen mountain counties one-half to three hours warning of flash-flood conditions. The system is designed to predict flash flooding in areas characterized by steep slopes and narrow valleys where flash flooding is likely to occur.
Record #:
34358
Abstract:
Following recent drought conditions, many North Carolina communities are developing water conservation plans and identifying backup water sources. Increasing development in some mountain watersheds is resulting in hydrologic changes, including increasing storm water runoff, erosion and sediment transport, unstable streambanks, and loss of flood plains. These changes will result in more frequent floods with greater impacts to low-lying communities.
Record #:
34864
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Great Flood of 1940 in North Carolina was caused by days of torrential downpours from a hurricane. Landslides caused by the rain and clear-cutting mountainsides engulfed several towns, killing twelve people and ruining hundreds of properties. This article remembers those that died and the impact the landslides had on the towns they crushed.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
36568
Author(s):
Abstract:
Familiar is how flooding from hurricanes affects Eastern North Carolina; Western North Carolina received relatively little attention. Illustrating the impact the flood of 1916, generated by two hurricanes that crossed this region, is the photo depicting Asheville’s experience. Also noted is the great amount of rainfall, among the heaviest recorded in United States history.