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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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22 results for Farming
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Record #:
4048
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A number of farmers work land that has been in that has been in their families for generations. Their farms have been named century farms by the N.C. Department of Agriculture. The state has about 1,400 century farms in ninety-three counties. Land for one of the oldest farms was purchased by John Knox on May 6, 1758, near what is now Salisbury and Statesville.
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Record #:
11616
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Although farming contributes about $70 billion annually to the state's economy, farms continue to decline. Between 1982 and 2007, over 1.8 million acres of farmland were lost along with 20,000 farms.
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Record #:
19984
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Farm journals were a major source of agricultural information in the 19th century. North Carolina published thirteen journals of the 500 publications produced nationwide before 1870. The author discusses these titles and their circulation across the state and nation, topics of discussion within such publications, and the readership of such papers.
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Record #:
24137
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Michael Jones used to manage factory hog farms but turned to smaller farming methods that humanely raise hogs that taste better and are hormone free.
Record #:
25139
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An effort is being made by local farmers and the Pamlico-Tar River Foundation to find ways to conserve water and soil.
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Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 4 Issue 4, Summer 1985, p2
Record #:
25327
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Over one hundred advocates for family farm and community health attended a meeting on Concentrated Animal-Feeding Operations. Many people gave speeches and actress Gloria Reuben launched a project.
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Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 27 Issue 4, Winter 2009, p1, il, por
Record #:
27187
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Entrepreneur Ben Greene wants to eliminate the gap between farm and table in the Research Triangle. His innovative farm-at-table mobile kitchen, The Farmery, serves meals made from locally grown food. The food is so local that most comes from a Crop Box, a regionally produced shipping container converted into a greenhouse, beside The Farmery's Airstream kitchen.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 33 Issue 23, June 2016, p16-17, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
27647
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Charlotte area farmers discuss their work and their concerns for the future of the farming industry as fewer and fewer young people are involved in agriculture.
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Record #:
27703
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Mark Hockney owns and operates Tiny Farm in Hillsborough, an 11 acre farm that reimagines what small scale farms are capable of. Hockney has created a business model that focuses on sustainable farming through innovation and long-term planning. Hockney grows organic greens 52 weeks a year and offers his workers above minimum wage, a 401k, and medical insurance.
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Record #:
28040
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Some farmers in North Carolina are switching from traditional crops to prawn aquaculture. Joe Thompson made the switch after he got injured and could not maintain a tobacco farm. Organizations like the Rural Advancement Foundation International-USA and the Golden Leaf Foundation are helping area farmers transition from tobacco farms. The farming of prawns yields a high profit with a low cost of labor and many area restaurants are eager to prawn’s on their menus.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 27 Issue 45, November 2010, p34 Periodical Website
Record #:
29732
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Abstract:
Living Web Farms is one of many farms and agri-businesses in Western North Carolina focused on providing practical education and inspiration to help people understand how to tend to both the land and themselves. They provide food to the hungry and teach classes in farming, food preparation, and the creation of alternative energy sources.
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Record #:
30767
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According to the revised estimates made by the North Carolina Department of Agriculture, over 35,000 fewer people harvested crops from over 258,000 fewer farm acres in 1957 versus 1956. The top crops of corn, cotton, and tobacco all saw a decline in the number of acres farmed with a net loss of over $1 million in principal money crops.
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We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 15 Issue 8, January 1958, p2-3, 18, il, map
Record #:
30927
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Part-time farming is becoming the norm with increased industrial opportunities moving into the state. For more than one in four farms in North Carolina, off-farm sources of income are greater than farm sales, and many farmers on large farms have off-farm income.
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Record #:
31037
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New whole grain wheat wafers have been developed for fall out shelters, while tax payers will receive some relief from a new wheat program available to farmers in 1962, along with a bigger wheat income forecasted for over $8 million. Additionally, a new method of harvesting honey has been developed, while tobacco has been described as the most suited crop for mechanical harvesting.
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Record #:
31180
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Abstract:
Cas Booe grows, processes, and sells his Yadkin Valley Popcorn at Shallowford Farms, a family owned and operated agribusiness located outside of Winston-Salem, North Carolina. Also known as the Popcorn King, Booe’s popcorn comes in a variety of flavors and forms, and has won national awards. In this article, Booe discusses his background, daily farming operations, marketing, and tours offered on the farm.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 35 Issue 12, Dec 2003, p23-25, il, por Periodical Website
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