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8 results for Byrd, Tom
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Record #:
31037
Author(s):
Abstract:
New whole grain wheat wafers have been developed for fall out shelters, while tax payers will receive some relief from a new wheat program available to farmers in 1962, along with a bigger wheat income forecasted for over $8 million. Additionally, a new method of harvesting honey has been developed, while tobacco has been described as the most suited crop for mechanical harvesting.
Subject(s):
Record #:
31067
Author(s):
Abstract:
Scientists at the North Carolina State College are shedding light on an important mystery of the tobacco plant--the source of its smell. Related to the tobacco gums secreted by the leaf hairs, tobacco's aroma can be studied using the chemistry of the trichomes.
Subject(s):
Record #:
31521
Author(s):
Abstract:
Wood is gaining a place as an industrial fuel in North Carolina. The state’s huge brick industry is following the lead of the wood products industry in converting from gas or oil to wood. Studies are also looking at the possibility of using wood in the generation of electricity.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 12 Issue 2, Feb 1980, p26-27, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
31655
Author(s):
Abstract:
A new 4-H camp site in Mulberry Valley, Caldwell County was a memorial gift of Mr. and Mrs. Luther Robinson of Lenoir, who lost their only two children to polio. The uniqueness of the camp lies in the fact that it will be used for primitive camping. The property was where the Robinson children were born, and has historical significance because the land once belonged to Israel Boone, a brother of Daniel Boone, from whom Mrs. Robinson is a fifth generation descendant.
Source:
Record #:
31737
Author(s):
Abstract:
The communities of Goldston, Drake, Cofield and Newfound have come together to solve problems in rural water systems, rural housing development, litter, and other local needs. These “community resource development” programs are becoming more prevalent across North Carolina, as citizens organize to improve their communities.
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Record #:
32013
Author(s):
Abstract:
Ten years ago, the rural Cofield community in Hertford County was poor and making little progress in development. With the help of the Farmers Home Administration and others, Cofield is moving forward in community development. They have expanded educational opportunities, installed a water system, promoted home improvement and employment programs, and initiated a garbage pick-up service.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 3 Issue 4, Apr 1971, p20-21, por Periodical Website
Record #:
32054
Author(s):
Abstract:
Families can lose substantial amounts of money and suffer many inconveniences because they are selecting poor homesites. In this article, soil scientists from North Carolina State University discuss the diversity of soil types found in the state and characteristics of suitable sites for land development.
Source:
Record #:
33360
Author(s):
Abstract:
Edgecombe County farmer Bellmont Murphrey is a pioneer in a new agricultural practice of controlled drainage with sub-irrigation. Murphrey built a control device on his main ditch that would permit the release of water during periods of high rainfall and the conservation of water at other times. His water management system has helped him to produce high corn yields, and interest in the new practice is spreading among other farmers.