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18 results for Dare County--Description and travel
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Record #:
4562
Author(s):
Abstract:
Today the Outer Banks are a tourist magnet. However, in the early 1920s, tourists weren't interested because the area lacked bridges, good roads, places to eat and sleep, and interesting activities. What the Outer Banks did have were visionaries like Washington Baum and Frank Stick, who pushed for these things, and Aycock Brown, first director of the Dare County Tourist Bureau, who put the Outer Banks on the map with his endless publicity.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 67 Issue 12, May 2000, p74-79, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
14583
Author(s):
Abstract:
Goerch writes about travels through Beaufort, Hyde, Dare, and Currituck County. The author remarks on places and people of interest in this coastal region. Distinguishing the area are features of local commerce, infrastructure, and history.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 14 Issue 12, Aug 1946, p3-7, 20, il
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Record #:
17102
Author(s):
Abstract:
In addition to the county's historical spots, Harris describes other interesting and unique sights in Dare County.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 6 Issue 5, July 1938, p1, 18, il
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Record #:
18285
Author(s):
Abstract:
Continuing his travels around the state, Goerch describes the things of interest he found in Dare County. \"It is,\" he writes, \"a place that is first in settlements, in wireless, in flight, in history, and in many other things, but it remains a section of the state that is still comparatively unknown to many North Carolinians.\"
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 9 Issue 10, Aug 1941, p1-4, 20-22, il, por
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Record #:
24861
Author(s):
Abstract:
Jockey’s Ridge has an intriguing history from its namesake, a shifting sand dune, to vanished buildings buried under the sand. Today, the ridge is a huge draw on the Outer Banks and is part of the Jockey’s Ridge State Park. The park offers numerous outdoor activities for everyone, including the handicapped.
Source:
North Carolina's Eastern Living Magazine (NoCar F 252.3 N82), Vol. Issue , February-March 2016, p100-104, 106, il, por
Record #:
28550
Abstract:
The history of post-mills in North Carolina and the location of a replica post mill in Dare County are detailed. Post-mills were common along the Outer Banks during the 18th and 19th centuries in Carteret, Hyde, and Dare counties. In the 1970s Lynanne Wescott built a replica post-mill located at Island Farm on Roanoke Island and it has become a local landmark.
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Record #:
30797
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Pirates Jamboree in Dare County, North Carolina featured the dedication of America's first National Seashore as an opening to the season in 1958. The rapidly developing region will welcome visitors for the vacation season, providing access to historical dramas, miles of surf line and fishing spots, Wright Brothers national Monument, Elizabethan Gardens, and now, the Cape Hatteras National Seashore.
Source:
We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 16 Issue 2, June 1958, p32-33, 48, por, map
Record #:
30895
Author(s):
Abstract:
Dare County, on the North Carolina Outer Banks, is a land of firsts. It is the place of England's first colonization of the New World, and the place of the first successful flight. Both of these events are commemorated for visitors through Fort Raleigh and the outdoor drama of the Lost Colony and the Wright Brothers National Monument.
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Record #:
35522
Author(s):
Abstract:
Shellfish—their lives, the industry’s livelihood—looked bleak when Red Tide rolled in. The future became brighter with its causes’ discovery: inadequate treatment of human and animal wastes. It also brightened with the solutions: improvement of septic tank surveillance and testing procedures. A chart reiterated the need for improvement, with counties ranging from Dare to New Hanover, waterways from Hyde County’s Kitty Creek to Harkers Island’s Back Sound.
Source:
New East (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 1 Issue 1, Jan/Feb 1973, p14-15, 35, 44
Record #:
35560
Author(s):
Abstract:
As the director of Dare County Tourist Bureau, Aycock Brown proved to be a memorable figure in ways that went beyond his Panama hat and ever present cameras. The best way, though, was a question from strangers directed to denizens: “do you know Aycock Brown”?
Source:
New East (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 1 Issue 2, Mar/Apr 1973, p30
Record #:
35756
Abstract:
The author provided a Dare County guide with information about the county celebrating its quadricentennial. Cited were the Lost Colony’s history and historic landmarks like Kittyhawk. Described were must see sites like Cape Hatteras, must do recreation like hang gliding off of Jockey’s Ridge; and must visit towns like Southern Shores. As pictorial accompaniment was a hand drawn map of Manteo depicting its historical homes like the Meekins house, businesses like The Old Bank Building, and event sites like the Battle of Burnside.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 4, July/Aug 1979, p30A-30T
Record #:
35784
Author(s):
Abstract:
Art has found a plenteous place in Dare County. Businesses that offered their places included Carolista Jewelry and Design, Barrier Island Gallery, and My Mother’s Place restaurant. Noted were individuals like printmaker Hubby Blevin (also an amateur archaeologist); New York born painter Jean Montana, and woodcarver Gary Storm. This flow of creative juices suggested something in the water—and air—inspired this bustling colony.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 7, Nov/Dec 1979, p17S-18S
Record #:
35779
Author(s):
Abstract:
Described were monuments to a momentous occasion in Kill Devil Hills’ history. One was the statue erected in 1927. Another, founded by a group of North Carolinians that year, was the Kill Devil Hills Memorial Association. A third was a museum that allowed visitors to experience vicariously the brothers’ first flights. As for another more recent endeavor, that was the First Flight Society started by NC natives such as Dare County’s Aycock Brown.
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Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 7, Nov/Dec 1979, p3S
Record #:
35780
Author(s):
Abstract:
Places in Dare County like Colington Island and the village of Duck offered haven for many creatures of the two legged variety. A book cited by Murray, John Lawson’s A New Voyage to Carolina (1709), also made mention of the Merlins and Swaddle-bills who inspired the first flight made almost two centuries later.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 7, Nov/Dec 1979, p4S-6S
Record #:
35873
Author(s):
Abstract:
What lends the Outer Banks mystique, may obviously lie in towns not widely known such as Duck. A source of mystique not so well known was one Tar Heel natives like Nell Wise Wechter debate: the name's origins. Seeking places to sup while touring the town touting mystique included Wanchese’s Fishermen’s Wharf, Nag Head’s Dareolina, and Kill Devil Hill’s Top of the Dunes.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 6, Aug 1980, p25-27