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5 results for Sand dunes--Nags Head
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Record #:
3722
Author(s):
Abstract:
Quick action by Nag's Head citizens in 1973 saved Jockey's Ridge from development. Today it is a 414-acre state park and National Natural Landmark. The sand dune, which is ninety feet tall and a mile long, is moving south at a foot a year.
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Record #:
11397
Abstract:
The highest coastal sand dune in the nation is the 140-foot tall Jockey's Ridge, which is located at Nags Head on North Carolina's Outer Banks. This article contains information on the conservation campaign led by Carolista and Walter Baum to save the dune and make a state park out of it.
Source:
We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 33 Issue 6, June 1975, p17-20, il, por
Subject(s):
Record #:
18486
Author(s):
Abstract:
Jockey's Ridge, located at Nag's Head on the Outer Banks, is the East Coast's tallest sand dune. Now a state park, it is the only one that moves. Over the years, its shifting and moving sands have swallowed a hotel, miniature golf course, a cemetery and a fishing village. It is also North Carolina's most visited state park.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 80 Issue 8, Jan 2013, p122-126, 128, 130, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
24861
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Abstract:
Jockey’s Ridge has an intriguing history from its namesake, a shifting sand dune, to vanished buildings buried under the sand. Today, the ridge is a huge draw on the Outer Banks and is part of the Jockey’s Ridge State Park. The park offers numerous outdoor activities for everyone, including the handicapped.
Source:
North Carolina's Eastern Living Magazine (NoCar F 252.3 N82), Vol. Issue , February-March 2016, p100-104, 106, il, por
Record #:
35516
Author(s):
Abstract:
This sand dune at Nag’s Head was made famous before five UNC seniors made it a class project’s subject. It was made famous—or infamous—by controversy generated between developers, environmentalists, and citizens from plans to build beachside subdivisions at its base.
Source:
New East (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 2 Issue 2, June/July 1974, p8