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8 results for Great Dismal Swamp (N.C. and Va.)
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Record #:
11307
Abstract:
The American Land Company purchased 100,000 acres of the Great Dismal Swamp that encompasses North Carolina and Virginia. Charles L. Gleaves, the company president, planned to utilize the land along the Albemarle Sound as an area for vacation communities. Further reclamation projects on this land included a plan for roadway construction to encourage companies to move to the area.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 33 Issue 17, Feb 1966, p9, 20, il, map
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Record #:
12735
Abstract:
The Great Dismal Swamp spreads over six counties in Virginia and North Carolina--nearly 1,000 square miles of water, timber, and occasional wild animals. The inundated area has been reduced more than 50 percent from its original 2,200 square miles since early 18th century. Currently, Washington's Forest, Inc. is working 24 hours a day to drain the swamp, building over 40 miles of canals.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 29 Issue 14, Dec 1961, p8-9, 20, il, por
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Record #:
21735
Author(s):
Abstract:
Almost 300 years ago Colonel William Byrd II described the Great Dismal Swamp as \"a great and dreary swamp not fit for man or beast.\" Today the swamp's 126,000 acres straddle the border of Virginia/North Carolina. It is a National Wildlife Refuge on the Virginia side and a state park on the North Carolina side in 2007. The swamp has become a place of enjoyment and education. In 2013 over 80,000 visitors came to the state park.
Record #:
16200
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Great Dismal Swamp presented a refuge for 17th-century Europeans hoping to become independent. The first English explorer in the Albemarle area was Nathaniel Batts in 1660 and he settled in the region after purchasing land from the native population. Eventually this initial settlement developed into a community of male and female craftsmen function in cooperation with the native population and free of society's constraints.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 47 Issue 1, Fall 2007, p27-29, il
Record #:
22711
Abstract:
The Great Dismal Swamp is the center of Gates County, North Carolina's fame, known for its bounty of flora and fauna, and tales of runaway slaves. What is overlooked however, is that in the eighteenth- and nineteenth-centuries--before the American Civil War--nearly four hundred free people of color called Gates County and the Great Dismal Swamp home.
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Record #:
30030
Abstract:
Livetrapping of small mammals was conducted in the Great Dismal Swamp and other areas of North Carolina in 1990. This study reveals the first published records of cottom mice (Peromyscus gossypinus) taken in this region since the 1930s.
Source:
Brimleyana (NoCar QL 155 B75), Vol. Issue 18, June 1993, p125-130, bibl Periodical Website
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Record #:
30043
Abstract:
This study surveyed bats in the Great Dismal Swamp, a forested wetland located in southeastern Virginia and northeastern North Carolina. Before this survey, only five species of bats were known in this area. Observations from bats collected in this study yield four new species in the Dismal Swamp area.
Source:
Brimleyana (NoCar QL 155 B75), Vol. Issue 17, Dec 1991, p17-25, bibl Periodical Website
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Record #:
35754
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Abstract:
A fragile wilderness could be found in Merchants Millpond State Park, on the southern edge of the Great Dismal Swamp. Despite its fragility, it had an important place and long history in the area. During the nineteenth century, the Millpond contained a gristmill, wheat mill, and sawmill. By the twentieth century, it had become the largest trading center in Gates County. Its present purpose: a viable habitat for animals such as river otters and plant species such as the water violet. As for the State Park’s benefits to humans, that included activities such as camping and backpacking, drawing and guided tours.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 4, July/Aug 1979, p34-35