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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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15 results for Handicraft
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Record #:
1531
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Western NC is pushing a program called \"Handmade in America,\" which organizers hope will expand the crafts industry and transform the economically depressed region into the crafts center of America.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 52 Issue 5, May 1994, p8-10, il
Record #:
2402
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Since colonial days, people living in the state's mountains have been creating their own jobs - that is, producing arts and crafts for their own use. Now these items, including hooked rugs and pottery, are highly prized by collectors.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 55 Issue 1, June 1987, p8-9, il
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Record #:
2856
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In an age of mass-production technology, traditional craftsmen continue to practice their art across the state. They learn their skills from more experienced craftspersons or from schools, like the Penland School of Crafts.
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Record #:
3804
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The John C. Campbell Folk School in Brasstown and the Penland School of Crafts in Penland are schools where professional artists create and beginners can explore new skills for their own growth and enjoyment. Classes include weaving, pottery, and photography.
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Record #:
5122
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Each summer upwards of 400 art connoisseurs, gallery owners, collectors, museum directors, and foundation heads converge on Penland in Mitchell County. They come for the Annual Benefit Auction, now in its 15th year, of works created at the world-renowned Penland School of Crafts. The auction raised $236,000 in 2000, and all the money supports Penland's programs and studies. Founded in 1929 by Lucy Morgan, the school has forty campus buildings and offers workshops in ten crafts.
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Record #:
8769
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The Shelton House in Waynesville is home to the Museum of North Carolina Handicrafts. The museum group purchased the house from Charles E. Ray, Jr., in 1978. Cherokee Indian crafts and artifacts are on display, as are handicrafts from well-known artisans of the state. State grants funded restoration of the house, and the museum is open from May 1st to November 15th each year.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 49 Issue 11, Apr 1982, p7-8, il, por
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Record #:
8848
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Cricket's Nest in Winston-Salem is a small non-profit store. It sells the senior citizens' crafts in Winston-Salem and surrounding Forsyth County, providing them with needed income. Sponsored by the public recreation department, the shop opened in November, 1976, and currently has a membership of 662.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 48 Issue 7, Dec 1980, p26-27, il
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Record #:
8947
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Carolyn Trail of Norwood orders wheat for weaving from Minnesota where it is organically grown and cut by hand. She makes baskets, wall hangings, and house blessings. Trail enjoys teaching her craft to local Girl Scouts as well as other townspeople. She hopes to soon work with a grower closer to home.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 47 Issue 12, May 1980, p20-21, il
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Record #:
13554
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Deep in the Smokies, visitors can see how Cherokees have kept their ancient arts alive.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 21 Issue 49, May 1954, p14-16, 51, f
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Record #:
13553
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A fascinating way to spend a North Carolina mountain vacation is to follow the Appalachian Handcraft trail.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 21 Issue 49, May 1954, p10-11, f
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Record #:
13555
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East of Murphy, North Carolina is the John C. Campbell Folk School for the Enrichment of Rural Life, home of appealing wood carvings.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 21 Issue 49, May 1954, p17-18, f
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Record #:
13597
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Frances Louisa Goodrich conceived the idea of encouraging, perpetuating, and preserving for posterity the ingenuously beautiful craftsmanship embodied in the frequently primitive accomplishments of North Carolina's mountain dwellers, and her efforts resulted in the formation of a unique industry and financial help to thousands of people.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 19 Issue 5, June 1951, p5, 24, f
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Record #:
15463
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It was in April 1934 when Hardy Liner and Charles Underwood of Lake Junaluska, North Carolina found themselves out of work and broke. But instead of giving up hope, they began making handicraft articles and now have a hundred thousand dollar a year business.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 4 Issue 44, Apr 1937, p7, 22, f
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Record #:
24042
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A non-profit organization uses a bus to travel to communities and provide creativity, movement, and activism by providing craft workshops to locals.
Record #:
30195
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Opened near Blowing Rock, North Carolina on the Blue Ridge Parkway, the Parkway Craft Center is a place to show off the crafts of Southern Appalachia. The Southern Highland Handicraft Guild, Inc. which runs the Center, will provide call for demonstrations of weaving, pottery, metal work and other crafts of the region.