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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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9 results for Folklore and education
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Record #:
2260
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Abstract:
The North Carolina Folklore Society honored Dan Patterson at its annual meeting on the UNC-Chapel Hill campus. Patterson, a member of the university's Curriculum in Folklore, has made significant contributions to the study of Southern folklore.
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Record #:
24456
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina’s Elderhostel programs are like summer camp for grown-ups, teaching skills such as how to play folk instruments and how to carve duck decoys for hunting. A number of schools participate in the Elderhostel programs, including Appalachian State University, John C. Campbell Folk School, and Mars Hill College.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 58 Issue 12, May 1991, p41-45, il
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Record #:
31535
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Folk Art Center on the Blue Ridge Parkway near Asheville, which opened earlier this year, is a major regional educational and activity center for the crafts and folklore of the Southern Highlands. Craftsmen regularly demonstrate their workmanship at the center, and folk dancing, folk music and film presentations are part of its regular schedule.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 12 Issue 9, Sept 1980, p8, il
Record #:
35179
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A collection of stories, unknown whether they are true, exaggerated, or completely false, circulated by students about the faculty and/or staff of Washington and Lee University.
Record #:
35254
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In this chapter, the author surmises the ways to categorize the types of folklore commonly found in Pacific areas by using either Type-Index or Motif-Index systems. To do this, tales from each region, such as Japan, China, and Southeast Asia, must be collected and analyzed for parallels between them.
Record #:
35501
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This article dated itself in the equipment and tools recommended: tape recorder, pen, and paper. However, historians using digital tape recorders and laptops can still gather practical advice from this former head of ECU’s Folk Life Archive about collecting folklore and local history.
Source:
New East (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 4 Issue 2, Mar/Apr 1976, p29-30
Record #:
35741
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Abstract:
The author reviews the novel, pointing out the particular folkways in the writing, such as riddles, speech, and folktales.
Record #:
36872
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A book review of Sean Burn’s biography on Archie Green, a man who lobbied for the practice of folklore and its place in American life.
Record #:
36465
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Abstract:
The author discusses how the folklorist goes about collecting history. He uses the making of bedspreads in Wautaga County, NC as an example of passing information down generations.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. Vol. 31 Issue No. 2, , p25-29, il