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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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21 results for Transportation
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Record #:
2149
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Abstract:
Segments of the state's transportation industry experienced mixed financial results in 1994, with various aviation and trucking companies having unsettled years, while ports like Morehead City and Wilmington increased shipping volume.
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Record #:
6189
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Abstract:
Six small transportation museums spread across the state highlight the machines that move us by land, sea, and air. These include the Carolina Aviation Museum (Charlotte); C. Grier Beam Truck Museum (Charlotte); the Daniel Stowe Carriage House, part of the Gaston County Museum (Dallas); Piedmont Carolina Railroad Museum (Belmont); North Carolina Maritime Museum, Southport Branch; and the Norlina Museum (Norlina).
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 71 Issue 6, Nov 2003, p122-124, 126, 128, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
8027
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North Carolina's population is growing, but the state's transportation infrastructure is not. By NC Department of Transportation estimates, transportation needs over the next twenty-five years will exceed funding by more than $30 billion. Carstarphen, the chair of NC Go!, the state's only broad-based statewide transportation advocacy organization, discusses the looming crisis in transportation and presents a five-point plan to address the problem.
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Record #:
9033
Abstract:
In the fall of 1900, Sarah and Retyre Couch and their two friends traveled by schooner wagon from the Sandhills to Greensboro. Because the roads between towns were not fully recovered after the war, the women often preferred walking to riding. The groups final exploration was of the Guilford Courthouse battleground. Sixteen days after they set out, the four returned home to Southern Pines.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 46 Issue 4, Sept 1978, p16-17, il
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Record #:
10900
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We the People of North Carolina magazine interviews Lauch Faircloth, Chairman of the State Highway Commission, on the status of the state's highway system.
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We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 27 Issue 7, July 1969, p42-43, 100, por
Record #:
10986
Abstract:
When We the People of North Carolina magazine interviewed Lauch Faircloth, Chairman of the State Highway Commission, in July 1969, he had been in office less than six months. In this interview, Faircloth discusses current policies, accomplishments, and plans for the future.
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Record #:
11590
Abstract:
The nine Republican and Democrat candidates for Governor present their views on state transportation policy. The Democrat candidates are Andy Barker, Jim Hunt, Ed O'Herron, Tom Strickland, and George Wood. Republican candidates are Jake Alexander, Dave Flaherty, Wallace McCall and Coy Privette.
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We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 34 Issue 7, July 1976, p20-21, 23-24, 88, por
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Record #:
13439
Abstract:
Although not known as a railroad center, North Carolina has a great profusion of short-line railroads. With slightly over twenty short-lines running, North Carolina can justly claim the title, \"Land of the Little Railroads.\" Primarily owned by small companies, these railroads operate under their own names, independently of any major system.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 29 Issue 5, Aug 1961, p9-11, il
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Record #:
15798
Abstract:
Until recently, the taxicab has been largely ignored by transportation planners as an important mode of urban public transportation. But studies show that taxicabs have produced more revenue for and provide better services for urban public transportation than bus and rail operations.
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Carolina Planning (NoCar HT 393 N8 C29x), Vol. 2 Issue 1, Winter 1976, p9-15, f
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Record #:
21178
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During the colonial period, eastern North Carolina possessed an inadequate and underdeveloped system of roads. To better road conditions, the colony tried appointing road commissioners, building bridges at public expense and putting up signposts and mile markers. Though they tried to improve the road network, the failure to enforce laws, the physical obstacles of the state's geography and shortages in the labor pool kept road conditions poor.
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Record #:
21632
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This article examines the North Carolina government's attempts to improve economic condition of the state during the Antebellum Period. North Carolina was very dependent on its neighboring states for economic support following the American Revolution. On the suggestion of several North Carolina governors, the General Assembly sponsored programs to improve the condition of the state's roads, railways, and waterways.
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Record #:
22329
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Various policies and types of state aid were used to create and repair the transportation networks in early North Carolina.
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Record #:
8295
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By the 1950s, Malcolm McLean of Robeson County had built one of the country's biggest transportation firms, the McLean Trucking Company. In 1956, he turned an idea he had been thinking about since 1937 into a reality. His invention 'containerized shipping' revolutionized the world of shipping. His idea was to build a tractor-trailer truck in which the trailer part could be lifted onto a ship or onto railroad cars, without anyone touching the contents, and transported to a particular destination, where it was loaded back onto a truck and delivered to the customers.
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Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 46 Issue 1, Fall 2006, p22-23, il
Record #:
29768
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Piedmont Triad region of North Carolina is quickly becoming a titan of transportation. Due to strong infrastructure in the transportation, distribution, and logistics sectors, and hubs for companies like FedEx, more transportation manufacturing and industries are moving into the area.
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NC Magazine (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 66 Issue 9, Sept 2008, p24-25, por, map
Record #:
36569
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Abstract:
Asheville’s Council on Aging offers services allowing elderly people on fixed incomes to live independently and economically in their own residences. The nonprofit organization provides services free of charge such as minor household repairs; Call-a-Ride, for those unable to drive or access public transportation; 911 Emergency Cell Phones, for at-risk seniors; In-Home Aide Services, to assist with completing daily tasks; Heat Relief, which provides fans and air conditioners during the summer. Funds and labor are provided primarily through the support of volunteers and donations from individuals.