NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


11 results for Bicycles
Currently viewing results 1 - 11
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
503
Author(s):
Abstract:
The bicycle has the potential to help free cities from choking on the pollution and traffic congestion born of the automobile, and to offer short-range, individualized travel at a low cost.
Source:
Carolina Planning (NoCar HT 393 N8 C29x), Vol. 15 Issue 2, Fall 1989, p19-25, il
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
3306
Author(s):
Abstract:
Bicycling in the late 19th-century brought not only a new form of transportation to the state, but also a change in the social order of men and women.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 57 Issue 2, July 1989, p32-34, il
Full Text:
Record #:
24097
Abstract:
Hearn's Cycling and Fitness is a popular store for bicycling equipment and a meetup for cycling enthusiasts. Opened in 1896, the store is the oldest business in Asheville and the oldest continuously-run bicycle shop in the nation.
Source:
Record #:
24109
Author(s):
Abstract:
The author discusses two electric bike stores that are making an impact in Asheville: Electro Bike Tours offers physically active city tours and Fast Lane Electric Bikes focuses on selling electric bikes to locals.
Record #:
27061
Author(s):
Abstract:
The city council voted to bring a bike-share program to downtown Raleigh, a proposal that has enjoyed support from many downtown residents and businesses. The lone dissenter was council member Kay Crowder, who argues that the program will serve only eight-percent of the city’s population. She thinks that money would be better spent on upgrading existing infrastructure.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
35564
Author(s):
Abstract:
A study in contrasts was the two bikes, the first given at age ten, the other purchased recently. One was light as a feather, the other seemingly weighed half a ton. One was easy to navigate up hills, the other hard to get up the front steps. With the benefits the more recent of the two offered, trips through towns like Edenton or Beaufort seemed less like exercise and more like joy rides.
Source:
New East (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 1 Issue 3, June/July 1973, p10, 37, 42
Record #:
36577
Author(s):
Abstract:
This nonprofit organization, offering bicycles at affordable prices and the opportunity to learn how to repair and build a bicycle. With bicycle parts donated and business operated by volunteers, Asheville ReCyclery offers more than relatively affordable transportation to school or work. It means helping others improve their lives while contributing to a sense of community.
Record #:
35895
Author(s):
Abstract:
How to get there was transportation of the two wheeled, self- propelled variety: bicycles. Encouraging people to forego four wheeled transport were directing them toward the virtues of scenic routes; route guides; route maps; and its ecological and fiscal frugality.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 7, Sept 1980, p22
Record #:
36307
Author(s):
Abstract:
The ELF—a conglomeration of a car, bike, and trike—intends to ease traveling in an increasingly urbanized world. Companies on a roll with this form of transportation include the profiled Organic Transit of Durham and its European counterpart, Schaeffler AG. Promotion of the product included these advantages: safer than a bicycle, more weather resistant than a scooter, and not subject to laws related to the electronic bike market.
Record #:
36457
Author(s):
Abstract:
This nonprofit organization, established nearly a decade earlier, sustained success due to its celebration, education, and advocacy of life on two wheels for both urban and commuter cyclists. Events included coordinating community rides such as the Bike of the Irish. Lobbying for transportation policy changes yielded the Hominy Creek Greenway and the non-profit’s collaboration with the city council in the creation of Asheville’s Comprehensive Bicycle Plan.