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11 results for Trucking
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Record #:
2149
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Segments of the state's transportation industry experienced mixed financial results in 1994, with various aviation and trucking companies having unsettled years, while ports like Morehead City and Wilmington increased shipping volume.
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Record #:
2216
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Government deregulation of the trucking industry caused some trucking companies to fold. Earl Congdon, chairman of Old Dominion Freight Lines, Inc. in High Point, cites the absence of unionization as one factor contributing to his company's profitability
Record #:
9343
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The rail and trucking industries are projected to grow significantly over the next decade in North Carolina. Statistics from the U.S. Department of Transportation indicate that in 1998 trucks in the state hauled over 426 million tons of goods. By 2010, tonnage is projected to grow to 641 million tons, and by 2020, to over 800 million tons. Similar gains are projected for the railroad cargo industry. Harris discusses what this will mean for the state's infrastructure.
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NC Magazine (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 65 Issue 7, July 2007, p12-15, il
Record #:
15492
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The Barnwell brothers, R. W., James A., and John H. joined forces to start a lucrative trucking business. R. W. and James A. made up the Barnwell Brothers Inc., in Burlington and John H. was head of Transportation Inc. in Charlotte. The fleet of trucks consisted of 160 trucks which hauled 93,000,000 pounds of freight over 5,000,000 miles.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 3 Issue 45, Apr 1936, p5, por
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Record #:
24303
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Marc Gustafson is president and CEO of Volvo Trucks North America Inc. and he plans to turn the company around by updating his trucking line with brand new premium trucks, not the outdated older models that put the business at the bottom in the first place.
Record #:
25064
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North Carolina seafood travels all over the country and all over the world. On place in particular it is sold is at the Fulton Fish Market in New York City. Truck driver Eric Voliva tells what it’s like to drive a Wanchese Fish Company truck.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Spring 2004, p6-11, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
25632
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Found alongside the two-lane road on Interstate 85 just east of Hillsborough, Chris’s Truckstop offers weary travelers and truckers a place for respite.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 3 Issue 19, October 11-24 1985, p1, 12-13, il Periodical Website
Record #:
3
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Trucking stocks are experiencing an upswing while the overall economy is suffering a downswing.
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Record #:
28474
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Driver shortages, autonomous vehicles and home delivery are forcing Thomasville, NC’s Old Dominion Freight Line to stay nimble. The country’s 10th largest trucking company’s CEO discussed the challenges and opportunities facing the company in 2017. Younger drivers are not replacing older workers, autonomous technology in trucks will be coming soon, and online shopping has helped Old Dominion’s shares triple over the last five years.
Record #:
30674
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The trucking industry and North Carolina Motor Carriers Association are watching road and highway development closely. Their interest is prompted not only by the improvement of highway facilities but the cost they pay in taxes. Trucks now pay a higher rate in taxes under the 1956 Federal aid law on gasoline, tires, gross weight, and excise tax.
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Record #:
36133
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New Bern, with maritime roots, became known as a major shipping port by the mid-eighteenth century. This helped to establish its place in the triangular trade and as the most populous town by the Revolution period. The War of 1812 and Civil War negatively impacted the trade-built economy. In fact, recovery by the 1870s occurred through growth in another industry: lumbering. Concerning its more current economy, industries contributing to its fiscal health since the nineteenth century were also transportation based: railroads and trucking.