NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


10 results for Transportation--North Carolina
Currently viewing results 1 - 10
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
10433
Author(s):
Abstract:
Burch presents a summary of the development of North Carolina's highway system and how it compares with other states.
Source:
We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 22 Issue 3, July 1964, p34-35, 65-67, il
Record #:
11940
Author(s):
Abstract:
Since the construction of 41,000 miles of super highways now links the nation in the form of an Interstate Highway System, the average citizen should be concerned with ways to attain income through its use. Recently, American Trucking Association (ATA) researchers set out to discover the potential of garnering income by studying representative sections of the new highway. In North Carolina, researchers studied a 33.3-mile section of highway, concluding it not only pays its own way, but returns an annual profit of $893,093.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 26 Issue 3, July 1958, p33-34, por
Full Text:
Record #:
24776
Author(s):
Abstract:
In this transportation and logistics round table, transportation insiders discuss why the transportation industry is important to North Carolina’s economy and what it needs to continue working.
Source:
Business North Carolina (NoCar HF 5001 B8x), Vol. 36 Issue 1, January 2016, p22-24, 26, 28-29, il, por Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
26560
Author(s):
Abstract:
A new guide produced by the National Wildlife Federation and Environmental Protection Agency aims to help cities reach the goals of clean air, efficient use of transportation funds, and cultural and economic revitalization.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 28 Issue 1, Jan 1981, p2, 15
Record #:
28119
Abstract:
A Triangle area music expert discusses how a regional mass transit system would improve the area’s music scene. Concert goers and musicians tend to not go to events outside their own cities or town’s because the traffic in the area makes trips inconvenient. With a better transit system, musicians and listeners would go to more concerts and collaborate more, allowing the area music scene to grow.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 25 Issue 10, March 2008, p19 Periodical Website
Record #:
28474
Author(s):
Abstract:
Driver shortages, autonomous vehicles and home delivery are forcing Thomasville, NC’s Old Dominion Freight Line to stay nimble. The country’s 10th largest trucking company’s CEO discussed the challenges and opportunities facing the company in 2017. Younger drivers are not replacing older workers, autonomous technology in trucks will be coming soon, and online shopping has helped Old Dominion’s shares triple over the last five years.
Record #:
30540
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina is known for its pioneering efforts in building railroads, seaports, and airlines. Between 1800 and 1837, North Carolina sponsored and owned the longest span of railroad in the world; this developed into the statewide system known today, with larger systems extending into other regions of the United States for both passenger and freight transport. Additionally, the state's ports are handling the ever-increasing import and export tonnage of industrial products along the eastern seaboard. Further, air transport in North Carolina is now fed by six lines, with large centers in several regions of the state.
Record #:
31984
Author(s):
Abstract:
The late Dr. Henry Jordan, Cedar Falls dentist turned industrial who served as Governor Kerr Scott’s State Highway chairman, predicted that interstate highways would lead to the end of the automobile age. As the costs of owning and operating an automobile increase, and traffic and parking problems persist in Raleigh, Jordan’s prediction seems to be coming true. This article discusses transportation planning in North Carolina.
Source:
Record #:
36254
Author(s):
Abstract:
Until 2017, one of the areas that had received comparatively little political attention in North Carolina’s state lawmakers is transportation. Under a Republican-controlled state government, ceasing the transfer of funds from the Highway Fund and Highway Trust Fund. This, along with a change in taxes and fees, promised to provide more funds for transportation-related projects. An accompanying chart illustrated the proposed transportation spending over the next four years.
Record #:
38662
Author(s):
Abstract:
The author discusses transportation, old roads and how families dropped down into North Carolina out of Virginia. She gives examples of old names from Virginia.