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Record #:
2479
Author(s):
Abstract:
The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development estimates the state's 1995 median family income at $36,100, compared to the national figure of $40,200.
Source:
State Planning Newsletter (NoCar HD 87.5 S72), Vol. 2 Issue 2, July 1995, p4-5, il
Subject(s):
Record #:
2914
Author(s):
Abstract:
The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development estimates the state's 1996 median family income at $39,100, compared to the national figure of $41,600.
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Subject(s):
Record #:
3131
Author(s):
Abstract:
Per capita personal income in the state rose from $3,024 in 1969 to $21,103 in 1995. During this period the state's ranking rose from 40th to 32nd.
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Subject(s):
Record #:
30216
Author(s):
Abstract:
Although per capita income in North Carolina has risen substantially since 1929, the state is still low on the rank of state income. As 44th in the country, North Carolina's per capita income only reaches $1,520 for 1951. Factors contributing to the lower income of southern states such as North Carolina are the agricultural economy and certain larger population groups such as children.
Subject(s):
Record #:
30220
Abstract:
North Carolina ranks 44th in the United States in per capita income. Sources of income that lead to the low percentage of income are mainly manufacturing and agriculture. Additionally, an unbalanced economy exists in the state where over 50% of the employment and over 50% of the wages is in only ten counties.
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Record #:
30461
Author(s):
Abstract:
Although it has been suggested that a study be done on the cause for North Carolina's low per capita income, it is argued that the reasons behind it are already known. Five major factors affect the low per capita income in the state: large percentage of children, a still predominantly rural economy, small farms, a large African American population, and low wages in many industries.
Subject(s):
Record #:
30476
Author(s):
Abstract:
Economic growth in the United States increased in the beginning of 2014, but has been declining since June. In North Carolina, the employment rate is still not back to the level before the recession, and bank profitability has stalled. These trends are driven by struggles in consumer income, salaries and wages.
Source:
Carolina Banker (HG 2153 N8 C66), Vol. 93 Issue 3, Fall 2014, p51-52, por
Record #:
31008
Author(s):
Abstract:
Per capita income for North Carolinians in 1959 was $1,485, a seven percent increase from 1958. However, the national average rose from $2,057 in 1958 to $2,166 in 1959. North Carolina now ranks 43rd in the country for per capita income.
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Record #:
36569
Author(s):
Abstract:
Asheville’s Council on Aging offers services allowing elderly people on fixed incomes to live independently and economically in their own residences. The nonprofit organization provides services free of charge such as minor household repairs; Call-a-Ride, for those unable to drive or access public transportation; 911 Emergency Cell Phones, for at-risk seniors; In-Home Aide Services, to assist with completing daily tasks; Heat Relief, which provides fans and air conditioners during the summer. Funds and labor are provided primarily through the support of volunteers and donations from individuals.
Record #:
36273
Author(s):
Abstract:
Economic and occupational growth in the Tarheel State, partly because of sectors such as banking and higher education, has fed what Hood called North Carolina Exceptionalism. What may be less obvious to those on both side of the political spectrum is the role that the Republican and Democrat parties have played in the growth of such sectors, whether for credit or blame.
Record #:
36275
Author(s):
Abstract:
On the downside to the takeover of AI in employment sectors: the elimination of jobs traditionally targeted for elimination, such as factory work; the elimination of highly paid positions such as software designing. Changes that may be a mixed blessing include a minimum guaranteed income provided by the government. However, what may be criticized now as a sign of a socialistic society may one day be regarded as the basis of economic survival.
Record #:
36279
Author(s):
Abstract:
Income inequality in North Carolina is illustrated through the map revealing where the one hundred counties fall, annual income wise. Only in four counties—Mecklenburg, Durham, Orange, and Wake—can individuals can earn ten percent over state average, pegged at $45,000. The author cited opportunity as a substantial factor. However, this inequality could narrow, with the annual salary increase in forty-seven counties revealing this promise.
Record #:
36286
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina’s recent changes in tax laws countered large companies such as Uber and Lyft attempting to avoid work-related taxes by classifying workers as independent contractors. As for how employees may help in the avoidance of this issue, the author advised those who may be vulnerable to misclassification to keep track of their status. Those particularly vulnerable to misclassification are workers hired through staffing agencies.
Record #:
38234
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina led the way in the United States in outlawing the practice of payday lending. However, still in place are socioeconomic conditions that make it a feasible option for some. Because of such factors, the pressure is mounting for its legislative repeal.