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11 results for Mecklenburg County--Economic conditions
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Record #:
2390
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Mecklenburg County is first in per capita personal income for 1992, according to a Bureau of Economic Analysis report that ranked the state's 100 counties for the periods 1980-82 and 1990-92.
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State Planning Newsletter (NoCar HD 87.5 S72), Vol. 1 Issue 3, Sept 1994, p3-5, il
Record #:
12787
Abstract:
Settled around 1750, the residents of Mecklenburg County have enjoyed a lucrative and varied history. Sustained through a variety of agricultural and eventually, commercial ventures, residents of Mecklenburg initially relied heavily upon cotton. Joining in the American dream of finding gold, Mecklenburgers first discovered the rare mineral in 1799. Dubbed by Cornwallis as the \"hornet's nest of stubborn revolutionaries,\" Mecklenburgers experienced the War of Sugar Creek, instigated a military campaign against a group of South Carolinian Tories, known as Scoffelites, and wrote their own Declaration of Independence. Mecklenburgers additionally participated in the Civil War, furnishing some 2,700 men to the cause, or one sixth of the county population.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 30 Issue 23, Apr 1963, p12-13, 31-37, il, por
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Record #:
12786
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Encompassing 543 square miles, Mecklenburg County, lies in a convenient location, approximately half-way between Atlanta and Richmond. Boasting four railroads, six hospitals, two daily newspapers, 450 congregations, and 38 of the nation's 50 largest firms, Mecklenburg additionally serves as the banking center for North Carolina. Sustained through industrial plants, of which Mecklenburg has at least 500, residents are also part-time farmers, utilizing forty percent of the county's land for agricultural production.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 30 Issue 23, Apr 1963, p9-11, 24-30, il, map
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Record #:
23900
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Clay Grubb, relator and owner of Grubb Properties, relies on a century-long family history in the business and hopes to profit from the younger generations in Charlotte.
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Record #:
24217
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Once a mill town, Pineville is now a mall town, the most retail-heavy municipality in North Carolina.
Record #:
24272
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In this roundtable, leaders and executives from the Charlotte region discuss the area's triumphs as well as its challenges, particularly how major obstacles are handled to continue to ensure growth.
Source:
Business North Carolina (NoCar HF 5001 B8x), Vol. 35 Issue 10, October 2015, p22-24, 26-27, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
24372
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Charlotte-Mecklenburg Hospital Authority works to bring in top nurses for employment in Charlotte’s hospitals despite declining enrollments in nursing programs in North Carolina since 1983.
Record #:
24743
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David Mullenix is the executive director of the Urban Ministry Center in Charlotte and has been for 21 years. He discusses the project he manages called Housing First Charlotte-Mecklenburg, which aims to end chronic homelessness in the Charlotte-Mecklenburg area.
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Record #:
27293
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The Belmont neighborhood in Charlotte was once a violent area. Now, the area is experiencing redevelopment, although many longtime residents see this as an issue since the value of these new homes have skyrocketed.
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Record #:
29176
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A strength of Charlotte, North Carolina's economy is its diversity. One such industry that adds diversity without putting strain in the region's resources is travel and tourism. In 1990, it was estimated that tourism pumped $1.26 billion into the local economy, providing revenue and jobs to the region.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 49 Issue 2, Feb 1991, pA12, A14, A16, por
Record #:
36279
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Abstract:
Income inequality in North Carolina is illustrated through the map revealing where the one hundred counties fall, annual income wise. Only in four counties—Mecklenburg, Durham, Orange, and Wake—can individuals can earn ten percent over state average, pegged at $45,000. The author cited opportunity as a substantial factor. However, this inequality could narrow, with the annual salary increase in forty-seven counties revealing this promise.