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8 results for Orange County--Economic conditions
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Record #:
5423
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Abstract:
This special NORTH CAROLINA magazine community profile supplement discusses Orange County, an area with a rich heritage dating back two and a half centuries. Today it is a county of world-class healthcare research and practice, high-tech start-ups, strong educational institutions from primary schools to UNC-CH, and thriving literary and artistic communities.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 60 Issue 8, Aug 2002, p21-23, 25-27, 29-30, il
Record #:
13389
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Sharpe details the geography, history, development, industry, and society of Orange County.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 21 Issue 18, Oct 1953, p1-3, 14-18, map, f
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Record #:
24730
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In mid-November 2015, a group of Orange County activists launched a grassroots effort to stand up for the county’s low-paid state workers. The protest, called The Orange County Living Wage Project, hopes to raise Orange County’s minimum wage to $12.7-an-hour—the amount that most labor experts believe is a living wage in the county. The project plans to offer certifications for business owners who promise to meet this new wage for all of their workers.
Source:
Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 32 Issue 44, November 2015, p7, 9, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
25760
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The town of Chapel Hill and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill have coexisted together for nearly two centuries. The university’s first long-range development plan in 60 years has been met with resistance from the community. An advisory committee made up of community and university leaders was formed to resolve any conflicts and address long-term development plans.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 5 Issue 22, Nov 19-Dec 2 1987, p9-12, por, map Periodical Website
Record #:
27111
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Living-wage campaigns have formed to certify businesses in progressive parts of North Carolina. The Orange County Living Wage Project, which launched last November, has attracted fifty-eight employers that now pay all employees at least $12.75 per hour. The organization, led by Susan Romaine and Orange County Commissioner Mark Marcoplos, estimates it has lifted the wages of nearly six thousand employees.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 33 Issue 17, April 2016, p7, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
27447
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Zoning issues over land in new the University Lake Watershed area in Orange County have residents upset. The zoning is intended to limit development and protect the water supply for Chapel Hill, Carrboro, and the university. Rezoning will increase restrictions on land use and likely reduce property values. Rural residents are upset and tensions have flared in Orange County.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 8 Issue 11, March 15-21 1990, p9-13 Periodical Website
Record #:
28186
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The Anathoth Community Garden is a symbol of peace-building among the diverse populations who live in Cedar Grove, NC. Founded after respected community member Bill King was murdered, the garden works to address the economic injustices that lay behind racial tensions. The garden serves many of the communities poorest residents through the donation of its produce and encourages community building among its members.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 25 Issue 50, December 2008, p29-31 Periodical Website
Record #:
28375
Author(s):
Abstract:
Residents in Orange County are struggling with growth. The planned University Station development project is being opposed by many citizens for its lack of rural character, how it may affect the environment, its burden on local schools, and the costs which the county may have to cover to make the development a reality. The timeline and plans for the development are also detailed.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 10 Issue 47, November 1992, p9 Periodical Website