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16 results for Taxes
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Record #:
11350
Abstract:
The automobile was in its infancy in the state in 1909 when the General Assembly passed a law levying a registration tax on motor vehicles. That was the beginning of highway user taxes in the state. Today this program brings in $400 million a year, and every person, business, or corporation owning or operating a motor vehicle in the state contributes to it. This article presents information on what these taxes were, are, and what they could become.
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We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 32 Issue 7, July 1974, p31-33, 128, il
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Record #:
25178
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Abstract:
There are both pros and cons to the new idea of charging corporations a “discharge tax.” This tax would be an incentive to pollute less, however, could allow corporations to purchase the right to pollute.
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Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 9 Issue 3, Spring 1990, p6
Record #:
26297
Author(s):
Abstract:
To pay for maintenance of inland waterways, the NC House of Representatives has passed a waterway user tax on barge fuel to be raised to six cents per gallon by 1981.
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Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 22 Issue 1, Winter 1978, p13
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Record #:
26749
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Abstract:
The North Carolina Nongame and Endangered Wildlife Fund raised enough money from tax contributions to fund the peregrine falcon restoration project. Two existing programs for bald eagles and sea turtles are also being continued using funds from the tax checkoff.
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Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 31 Issue 5, Sept/Oct 1984, p14
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Record #:
27207
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Abstract:
The North Carolina Senate proposed a constitutional amendment that would cap the state’s income tax rate at 5.5 percent. If it is approved, the state will have to look for other revenue sources or cut public services whenever it needs money. One revenue stream would be a sales tax increase, which would hit lower-income families the hardest.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 33 Issue 25, June 2016, p7, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
30101
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Abstract:
The North Carolina State Department of Tax Research has been investigating the discussion of the proposal to give credit on state taxes for income taxes paid to the federal government. Research into other state approaches has shown that with this system, equity is not served to the taxpayer, there are problems with administration and budgeting, and most of all, there is a loss of total revenue from the state's General Fund.
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Record #:
30496
Abstract:
The scope of the Tax Reform Act of 1986 is remarkably broad, affecting practically every taxpayer, and many will face new tax-planning decisions. This article summarizes some of the more significant changes in tax law affecting individuals and businesses in North Carolina. Some of these changes pertain to tax rates, tax credits, personal exemptions, income, and itemized deductions.
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Carolina Coast Business Review (NoCar HF 5001 C38x), Vol. 5 Issue 1, Jan 1987, p2-6, il, bibl, f
Record #:
30736
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Abstract:
New state taxes, such as a sales and use tax on digital property, begin this year in North Carolina. This article discusses the state’s current tax system, taxing authorities, and tax credits relevant to electricity.
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Record #:
31018
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Abstract:
The United States' citizens are now carrying the highest tax burdens in the country's history. In 1960, all local governments spent $29 billion. State budgets spent 25%, or $8 billion on education, while the average four person household spends about $3700 of its annual $6000 income for goods and services.
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Record #:
31027
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Abstract:
Comparisons between 1960 and 1961 state collections after refunds and provisions for distribution to localities show a 19.44% increase in state taxes. Revenue came from inheritance, income, sales, and gasoline taxes mostly.
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Record #:
31174
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Abstract:
North Carolina ranks twenty-third in the US in per capita tax burden when looking at per capita state only. When combining the state and local tax burden, North Carolina only ranked forty-fifth in all. It is estimated that with the extension of the sales tax to food and other formerly exempt items in 1963, North Carolina's ranking will increase.
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Record #:
31301
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Abstract:
The State of North Carolina has taken steps to make the state an attractive place for retirees, in financial terms. Under current state laws, retirees get a big break when income tax time comes around through generous exemptions. This article discusses some of these state income tax exemptions and Social Security benefits.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 21 Issue 4, Apr 1989, p24-25, il Periodical Website
Record #:
31350
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Abstract:
North Carolina’s congressional delegation, which rarely votes unanimously on any issue, has split solidly with the Reagan White House on the matter of limiting textile imports. This article discusses the textile industry, foreign trade, and tax reform in North Carolina.
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Record #:
32235
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Abstract:
Bill Sharpe warns against hurting North Carolina’s insurance industry in the pursuit to attract new corporations. While the 57’NC Legislature adjusted the corporate tax several million downward, the premium taxes on domestic life insurance were increased by fifty percent.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 26 Issue 12, Nov 1958, p9-10, il
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Record #:
35475
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Abstract:
NC's 1995 General Assembly faced elections yields that were a conglomerate of national and local interests. The national and local legislative wish list focused on reforms to taxation, welfare, governmental operations, and bureaucratic operations. NC’s voters sought improvements in their design and construction industries. The item on their wish list: single prime contracts, boasted to be more time and cost efficient than multi-prime contracts.
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