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17 results for Democratic Party
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Record #:
20955
Author(s):
Abstract:
Three Apex City Council seats will be filled after the November 5th election in Wake County. The two Democratic candidates, Jennifer Ferrel and Nicole Dozier, are introduced to readers and the author looks at these local elections to predict state-wide elections and replacing the Republican dominated legislature.
Source:
Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 30 Issue 42, Oct 2013, p17, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
26965
Author(s):
Abstract:
If Democratic candidates are to win southern votes on Super Tuesday, they must recognize that the South is a diverse region of many cultures, politics, and ideologies. Among the candidates are Michael Dukakis, Albert Gore, Richard Gephardt, and Jesse Jackson.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 6 Issue 4, Feb 25-Mar 9 1988, p6-12, il Periodical Website
Record #:
26992
Abstract:
The election of George Bush to president has left Democrats with negative feelings about the campaign process. According to Paul Luebke, a University of North Carolina-Greensboro sociologist, the Democrats can beat Republicans statewide only if they specifically show how they stand on issues and how Republicans don’t.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 6 Issue 22, Nov 17-30 1988, p11-15, por Periodical Website
Record #:
27052
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 2016, while it’s unlikely that North Carolina Democrats will reclaim the House or Senate, they do have a chance to win back some power. They need to flip four seats in the House to be able to uphold a veto, which will become key if either of the Democratic candidates for governor, Roy Cooper or Ken Spaulding, wins next year.
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Record #:
27063
Author(s):
Abstract:
Bernie Sanders was brought to a halt as Hillary Clinton racked up big wins in North Carolina, Florida, and Ohio during last week’s primaries. But his political revolution prevailed by pushing Clinton to the left, eliciting firmer commitments on things like immigration, free trade, and environmental policy than Clinton would have made otherwise. The coalition he built will define leftist politics into the foreseeable future.
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Record #:
27241
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At the Democratic National Convention, Hillary Clinton became the first woman to accept a major party’s nomination for President of the United States. In North Carolina, U.S. Senate candidate Deborah Ross’s chances are almost inextricably tied to Clinton’s success.
Source:
Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 33 Issue 31, August 2016, p10-13, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
27440
Author(s):
Abstract:
Former Charlotte mayor Harvey Gantt is looking to become the first African-American politician to be nominated by the Democratic Party for the upcoming US Senate race against Jesse Helms. Gantt was the first black student to attend Clemson University and formed the first integrated architectural firm in Charlotte. Gantt is a strong advocate for health care, environmental issues, and education. If he beats Helms, Gantt would be the only black senator currently serving in the United States.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 8 Issue 8, Feb. 22-28 1990, p7-10 Periodical Website
Record #:
27453
Author(s):
Abstract:
Bo Thomas a wealthy fruit-and-vegetable distributor and state legislator from Hendersonville, NC is attempting to become the Democratic Party’s nomination for US Senate. If he is chosen in the primary, Thomas will run against US Senator Jesse Helms for the NC seat. Thomas is an experienced lawmaker unafraid to make bold statements. His comments and attacks on opponents will either help him win support or stop his campaign before it starts. Thomas and his work as a politician and progressive Democrat focused on environmental protection and social issues are profiled.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 8 Issue 17, April 26 - May 2 1990, p7, 11 Periodical Website
Record #:
27450
Author(s):
Abstract:
Michael Easley is district attorney from Southport, NC who is attempting to secure the Democratic nomination for US Senate in the upcoming race against Senator R-Jesse Helms. Easley is using his experience as a law enforcement officer and his tough stance on drugs in an attempt to appeal to voters. The little-known candidate is profiled and is billed as the man to beat Helms, but only if voters know who he is.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 8 Issue 14, April 5-11 1990, p7-9 Periodical Website
Record #:
27513
Author(s):
Abstract:
E. Lawrence Davis is the new chair of the Democratic Party in North Carolina. Davis is one of the most conservative Democratic chairs in the nation and has changed many of his progressive positions on issues like the environment to more conservative positions. One of his main goals is to attract more conservative white men to the party and is working to do this through NC Democratic Party politics.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 7 Issue 6, March 23 - April 5 1989, p10-13 Periodical Website
Record #:
27888
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina US Senator Richard Burr is one of the most vulnerable Republican senators this election. Three NC Democrats are looking to unseat Burr this fall. Elaine Marshal, Cal Cunningham, and Ken Lewis are the three most likely to do so. All three are profiled, but all three are similar in their political views. The only thing that separates the three is gender and race.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 27 Issue 13, March 2010, p5-7 Periodical Website
Record #:
28033
Author(s):
Abstract:
Currently, Democrats are not serving the working people, the poor, and spreading their ideals like they used to. Democrats lack the passion and vision when compared to their Republican opponents. Because of this, Democrats in North Carolina are struggling to get elected and Republican ideals and policies dominant in the state. The essay looks at how Democrats have lost their way and calls for a new type of progressivism to rise up.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 27 Issue 42, October 2010, p20-23 Periodical Website
Record #:
28088
Author(s):
Abstract:
John Edward’s populist message has influenced the Democratic race for the presidential nomination. Edwards focus on ideas and the progressivism of the Democrat race are products of Edward’s early campaign. Edward’s darker view of the future of America is contrasted with Barrack Obama’s more optimistic view. The difference between the styles and messages of two candidates are detailed and further examples provided from the current race.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 25 Issue 2, January 2008, p5 Periodical Website
Record #:
28146
Author(s):
Abstract:
John Verdejo is delegate who is representing North Carolina's 13th Congressional District at the Democratic National Convention. Verdejo speaks about his background and why he is excited about Barack Obama’s potential presidency. Verdejo is a Latino who represents an emerging generation of political activists who grew up under Presidents Reagan and Bush Sr. and witnessed cuts in domestic programs and widening economic disparities. Verdejo also takes to heart the community-empowerment message at the root of Obama's success and Verdejo represents many who are excited by Obama’s campaign.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 25 Issue 36, September 2008, p5-11 Periodical Website
Record #:
36273
Author(s):
Abstract:
Economic and occupational growth in the Tarheel State, partly because of sectors such as banking and higher education, has fed what Hood called North Carolina Exceptionalism. What may be less obvious to those on both side of the political spectrum is the role that the Republican and Democrat parties have played in the growth of such sectors, whether for credit or blame.