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16 results for Employment--Statistics
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Record #:
3619
Author(s):
Abstract:
The state's one-hundred largest employers are ranked. Food Lion headed the list with 31,270 employees. Hechts and Apple Gold tied at 100, with 2,100 employees.
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Record #:
4906
Author(s):
Abstract:
The state's largest one hundred employers are ranked. In 1991, Sara Lee Corp., with 22,000 workers, and Food Lion with 21,700 ranked first and second. In 2001, Delhaize America, Inc., ranks first with 36,405 employees and Wal-Mart Stores Inc. holds second with 33,400.
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Record #:
26995
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Triangle has one of the nation’s lowest unemployment rates, registering at about three-percent most months. However, this statistic does not capture the thousands of people who want a job but are discouraged by their personal constraints. Homeless and welfare recipients are also unaccounted for in unemployment statistics.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 6 Issue 23, Dec 1-15 1988, p6-7, por Periodical Website
Record #:
30250
Author(s):
Abstract:
At the last quarter of 1952, more than sixteen thousand employers reported there were more than 737,000 workers in the state of North Carolina. With a four percent increase over 1951, workers received more than $532 million in wage payments, a weekly average of $55.87.
Record #:
30257
Author(s):
Abstract:
Despite high local employment in North Carolina, the proposal to give states credit for unexpended balances failed to pass administration in Congress. North Carolina has lost several million dollars as the Employment Security taxes meant to be added to state reserve funds have been used for other purposes.
Record #:
30476
Author(s):
Abstract:
Economic growth in the United States increased in the beginning of 2014, but has been declining since June. In North Carolina, the employment rate is still not back to the level before the recession, and bank profitability has stalled. These trends are driven by struggles in consumer income, salaries and wages.
Source:
Carolina Banker (HG 2153 N8 C66), Vol. 93 Issue 3, Fall 2014, p51-52, por
Record #:
30561
Author(s):
Abstract:
Reports for the latter half of 1955 show that North Carolina business was good. Employment of available labor in every section of the state was high compared to similar periods and preceding months. Increased hiring, manufacturing employment, and seasonal adjustments were high from Asheville to Charlotte, and Greensboro to Fayetteville.
Record #:
30577
Author(s):
Abstract:
Although seasonal fluctuations in tobacco processing and outdoor employment such as construction caused decreases in employment during the winter, 1955 on average saw an increase in the number of available jobs. Improved conditions were seen in the total of 154,151 job placements, 11 percent over 1954.
Record #:
30785
Author(s):
Abstract:
In the third quarter of 1957, insured employment reached a new high, moving upward from over 829,000 to over 857,000. Although seasonal trends are present, employment levels have been higher since 1956 when insurance covered was lowered from coverage of eight to four or more workers per business. Employment increases were seen in all industry groups except service, and gross wages were up 5 percent of those in 1956.
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Record #:
30781
Author(s):
Abstract:
As compared with the previous year, North Carolina has experienced a downward trend in employment. Employment in non-agricultural activities declined between September and January, while manufacturing employment dropped three percent. Employment declines in trade were double those of a year ago and heaviest in merchandise and food service and stores.
Record #:
30890
Author(s):
Abstract:
Over 859,000 wage earners were insured against unemployment in the fourth quarter of 1958. Pay averaged $67.86 a week, which was 5.6% higher than the previous year. However, a considerable portion of employees in the state are still not covered such as privately employed people, and public employees of state and local governments.
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Record #:
30922
Author(s):
Abstract:
Despite a short, down trend blip in January, February 1959 employment turned upward and reached over 845,000 by March. The monthly record set a high, with a 4.6 percent increase above the first quarter of 1958. If this is an indicator of the climate, then there should be a record all-time high before then end of the year.
Record #:
31109
Author(s):
Abstract:
For North Carolina, in the last decade there was great effort expended to bring about industrial and social progress. Enrollment in North Carolina colleges has substantially increased, while advances in technology and business have increased professional engagement in engineering, manufacturing, and other professional groups like lawyers and physicians.
Record #:
31226
Author(s):
Abstract:
Between 1943 and 1962, wages in North Carolina have gone up considerably, as well as the number of people employed. In 1943, the total payroll was over $806 million, but in 1962 the payroll was well over $3 billion. Additionally, due to the increase in employs in the state, more taxes paid by employers are added to the state tax reserve for unemployment benefits.
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Record #:
33116
Author(s):
Abstract:
The last five years represented relatively turbulent times for employee benefits. This article offers an analysis of benefits provided by ten North Carolina employers, and compares the statistics to nationwide trends.
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