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7 results for Peele, Wendell
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Record #:
8996
Author(s):
Abstract:
The dipping pool, located in Martin County's Griffin Township, was used as a swimming hole by children. It served a dual purpose, however, as ministers used it in baptism services. Quite often, in winter, ice had to be broken to reach the water. No longer used either for swimming or baptisms, today the hole is almost completely hidden by overgrowth.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 48 Issue 3, Aug 1980, p30, il
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Record #:
10828
Author(s):
Abstract:
The history of the Roanoke River in Martin County dates back to the time of Sir Walter Raleigh. Crews of men from Raleigh's expedition oared their way up the Roanoke to the present day site of the Williamston bridge before being attacked and driven back to their boats by Tuscarora Indian warriors. Since that time, the Roanoke has served Martin County as a fishery, as a means of transportation, as a resource for manufacturing plants, and even as a military conduit during the Civil War. Because of this long-term interconnectivity, many Martin County residents feel that the river, despite flowing through two states and many counties, is their own.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 35 Issue 1, June 1967, p8-9, il
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Record #:
11921
Author(s):
Abstract:
At least one thousand German and Italian POWs were imprisoned in Williamston, North Carolina during WWII. Used to fill manual labor voids created during the war, the prisoners were forced to harvest peanuts and tobacco, assist on dairy farms, as well as work in fertilizer plants and saw mills. These men were the first POWs to be used during the war as an industrial force.\r\n
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 31 Issue 17, Jan 1964, p7, 31, il, por
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Record #:
12778
Author(s):
Abstract:
Established in the early 1870s to provide home sites for personnel of an English stock company that organized the Jamesville and Washington Railroad and Lumber Company, Dymond City, North Carolina existed as a veritable city in the woods. Originally called Waring, in honor of Richard Waring, one-time president of the J & W Company, Dymond City was once populated by over one hundred residents.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 30 Issue 20, Mar 1963, p13, 39, il
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Record #:
12776
Author(s):
Abstract:
Shad, rock, and the occasional sturgeon may be the prized fish of the Roanoke, but herring is the, \"king fish,\" of Jamesville. Caught in seine nets stretched along the width of the river, herring catches, often exceeding 5,000 pounds or over 20,000 fish, are dragged upstream to the fishery, the only one of its kind on the eastern seaboard.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 30 Issue 20, Mar 1963, p9-11, il
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Record #:
13447
Author(s):
Abstract:
The 20th-century merges with the past on the Cashie River in Bertie County, as the Sans Souci Ferry now plies its passage in the wake of outboard motorboats. Frail, yet functional, the ferry was originally propelled the operator pulling on a steering cable; now its power comes from a gasoline engine. Operated toll free by the State Highway Commission, the ferry is located east of Windsor off U.S. Highway 17.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 29 Issue 11, Oct 1961, p19, il
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Record #:
35527
Author(s):
Abstract:
Progress for its county and seat could be perceived as inevitable. The county named for the last Royal Governor considerably contributed to Revolutionary and Confederate War efforts. Its development was continually impacted by the Roanoke River, which spurred the establishment of a Weyerhaeuser company plant. As for recent progress, education’s advancement beyond the public education level was assured in a community college opening in the early 1970s.
Source:
New East (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 1 Issue 1, Jan/Feb 1973, p26-29, 36-39