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12 results for Boats and boating--North Carolina, Eastern
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Record #:
7170
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Abstract:
By boat is the best way for some vacationers to travel from the Great Dismal Swamp down to Old Baldy Lighthouse off Southport. Each a year about 2,000 snowbirds (people who travel south in the winter and north in the summer) sail that route. Many others enjoy fishing, birdwatching, cruising, kayaking, and sightseeing in the well-maintained waters of eastern North Carolina. Wright describes sights to see along the waterways and a short distance inland.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 63 Issue 4, Apr 2005, p46-47, il
Record #:
8711
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Leutze reports on the results of a two-year research project conducted at the University of North Carolina at Wilmington on the economic impact of the Intracoastal Waterway. The survey was aimed at recreational boaters from the Virginia to the South Carolina border.
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Record #:
12611
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The demand of sport fishing charters in North Carolina is dwindling do to an increase in private boating. A professional fishing guide, arranged by county, is included in this article. Details on the following counties are listed: Dare, Ocracoke, Carteret, Sneads Ferry, Swansboro, New Hanover, Southport, and a section titled, \"further west.\"
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 30 Issue 13, Nov 1962, p12-14, il
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Record #:
15981
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Abstract:
Reggie Fountain managed his successful motorboat company for 30 years building approximately 10,000 speed boats for celebrities, dignitaries, and presidents. After years of successes his company and subsidiaries declared bankruptcy in late 2009. Fountain's company meant more than making him a millionaire but kept hundreds of Beaufort County citizens employed, becoming the county's largest private employer.
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Record #:
16334
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Reggie Fountain is a champion powerboat racer and his company, Fountain Powerboats of Washington, is a $20 million-a-year business in a boating industry that has doubled to $18 billion nationwide as of 1988. However, overproduction and a downturn in luxury boat buying has reduced profits for many and some manufacturers have gone into bankruptcy. Perkins discusses Fountain's company and its prospects for the future.
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Business North Carolina (NoCar HF 5001 B8x), Vol. 10 Issue 6, June 1990, p56-58, 60, 62, 65, 67, por Periodical Website
Record #:
17784
Author(s):
Abstract:
Deadrise skiffs are a local, vernacular craft made specifically in the area of Core and Bogue Sounds. The shallow centerboard vessels are still built in the same way, using the same materials because the design is so well-suited for the environment. Initially used as work boats and for fishing, modern watermen typically use the boats for recreational purposes.
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Tributaries (NoCar Ref VK 24 N8 T74), Vol. Issue 13, October 2005, p29-33, il
Record #:
31356
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Abstract:
The year of 1984 marks the 400th year since a small English exploratory mission sent by Sir Walter Raleigh landed on the Outer Banks, as well as the arrival of the Lost Colony and birth of Virginia Dare. The anniversary celebration will begin in July with a flotilla of boats at Manteo, led by one of America’s best-loved sailors, Walter Cronkite. The parade of boats will sail from Elizabeth City, down the Pasquotank River, through the Albemarle Sound to Roanoke Island.
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Record #:
34473
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This article is a segment of an oral history with Alton Taylor, who recalls taking agricultural produce to Virginia in his father’s sharpie. Vessel dimensions are given, along with details of the trip.
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The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 8 Issue 2, Spring 1992, p8
Record #:
34471
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Abstract:
This article addresses the history and use of the sailing sharpie CHASE, destroyed in a 1933 hurricane. The brief article includes vessel dimensions and general use.
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The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 8 Issue 2, Spring 1992, p7, il
Record #:
34476
Author(s):
Abstract:
This article is a segment of an oral history with Alton Taylor, who recalls catching oysters for sale. Descriptions of his family’s boat and oystering locations are also included.
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The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 8 Issue 3, Summer 1992, p9, il, por
Record #:
35523
Author(s):
Abstract:
This industry was booming because of nearby waterways, plentiful workers, temperate climate, and better transportation facilities. On hand to help perpetuate the economic upswing were the financially salvaged Grady-White and Norfolk based Merrimack Marine.
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New East (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 1 Issue 1, Jan/Feb 1973, p16-17
Record #:
35994
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Abstract:
Toys common during her great grandmother’s childhood were rag dolls for girls and carved boats for boys. These objects had the role toys typically play in any culture: to prepare children for anticipated gender roles to take on as adults. As to another cultural aspect revealed, the toys reflected a time perhaps regarded as simpler by many younger generations.
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Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 4 Issue 3, Spring 1978, p6-7