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4 results for Fishing villages
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Record #:
2015
Author(s):
Abstract:
Flanked by rowdy Atlantic Beach to the east and upscale Emerald Isle to the west, Salter Path, located on Bogue Banks barrier island in Carteret County, has resisted drastic change and retained its reputation as a close-knit fishing village.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 62 Issue 7, Dec 1994, p10, 12, il
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Record #:
35627
Author(s):
Abstract:
Summer fishing had its attraction, but it was more for tourists, the author opined. To his estimation, fishing in the time after the vacationers left had at least three special qualities. The onset of chill encouraging the catch to move to deeper waters, was the first. The departure of the masses leaves more space in the waterways, was the second. The exodus of summertime insects makes the experience on the open water more pleasant, was the third.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 5 Issue 5, Oct 1977, p30-33
Record #:
38300
Abstract:
The stories of three Eastern North Carolinians help explains how Eastern North Carolinians endure challenges threatening a way of life sustaining them for four centuries. In recounting the lives of individuals from Atlantic, Frisco, and Beaufort, Garrity-Blake also explains her enduring passion for helping to preserve this way of life. Also attesting this passion are activities like her compilation of oral histories for the National Park Service’s study of Outer Banks villages and co-authoring Fish House Opera.
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Record #:
40009
Author(s):
Abstract:
Organizations interested in becoming better caretakers to North Carolina’s 1700 watersheds created the North Carolina Watershed Stewardship Network. In addition to workshops, the Network has engaged in initiatives such as obtaining feedback from communities about research, education, and training support needed to resolve water-resource issues. Also affirming the Network’s necessity was water-related stories shared by the North Carolina Sea Grant staff and friends, told in words and photos.
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