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4 results for Carving (Decorative arts)
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Record #:
27631
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William Buckland is known for his architectural carving work in Richmond County, Virginia, but evidence of his work in Maryland has been questioned. Researchers at the Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts in Winston-Salem, North Carolina reassessed Buckland’s career from 1771-1774 through a comparative study of six houses, two documented and four previously attributed to his shop.
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Record #:
27630
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Researchers at the Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts in Winston-Salem, North Carolina examined the carving work of William Buckland and William Bernard Sears. Their carving represents some of the most important American interior architecture of the Rococo period.
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Record #:
27697
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Researchers at the Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts in Winston-Salem, North Carolina conducted a study of the work attributable to the anonymous artisan identified as Humphrey Sommers’ carver. Sommers’ high social status in late colonial Charleston, South Carolina is evident in the Rococo interior architecture and stylistic work of his personal estates.
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Record #:
27712
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A study by the Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts in Winston-Salem, North Carolina revealed that tombstones became important religious and social symbols in York County, South Carolina in the late eighteenth century. The construction of tombstones manifested unique carving art and development in the region. But because tombstones were expensive to erect, they were a statement of economic and social superiority.
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