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11 results for Appalachian Region, Southern--Social life and customs
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Record #:
12255
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Pigeon Roost resident, Harvey James Miller, was sole contributor to the Winter 1974 edition of FOXFIRE MAGAZINE, a publication dedicated to preserving the knowledge of folkways, folklore, and crafts of southern Appalachia. Miller's homespun writing style and grassroots reporting provide an authentic and thorough account of a vanishing lifestyle.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 42 Issue 10, Mar 1975, p18-19, 37, il
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Record #:
24643
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Most of the earliest settlers of the Appalachians came from the English Isles and other northern European regions. The author provides examples of the syntax and popular phrases of settlers in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 26 Issue 21, March 1959, p9-10, il
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Record #:
24769
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Born in Southwestern Virginia, Lee Smith is an American fiction author who has won a number of awards, including the North Carolina Award for Literature. In this autobiographical piece, Smith discusses her influences—including Appalachia, Eudora Welty, and James Still—and her journey as a writer.
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Record #:
25108
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Linguist Paul Reed describes the history of North Carolina’s Appalachian dialect, saying that it is a combination of American Indian languages and the languages of other immigrant groups blended together. Geography has also contributed to the conservation of the dialect over the years.
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Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 55 Issue 2, Spring 2016, p12-13, il, por
Record #:
22643
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The community of Todd, North Carolina have gathered to harvest and boil sorghum for molasses for the past thirty-six yeas. Like many other communities in Watauga County, the molasses boil has been a part of the Appalachian agricultural practice and community traditions for centuries.
Record #:
31102
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Rob Amberg was a writer and photographer who documented Appalachian culture in Madison County, North Carolina. “Sodum Laurel Album” is a flowing record of candid recollections by Amberg, musician Dellie Norton and her family interwoven with intimate photographs shot over two decades. Stories and pictures mark harvest seasons for vegetables, porch gatherings of family and friends, fiddle and banjo ballads, and other traditions in the remote mountain community.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 35 Issue 1, Jan 2003, p20, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
31236
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Born in Watauga County in 1884, W.R. Trivett taught himself the art and science of photography to supplement his farming income. Trivett’s photographs challenged the stereotypical views of Appalachians being poor, uneducated, and isolated. The majority of Trivett’s subjects followed popular culture and represented the truest portraits of the region.
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Record #:
34411
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Katie Button discusses her research on the history of food in the Appalachian region. Among her research were “leather britches,” a term referring to an old Appalachian way of preserving greasy beans in the winter by stringing them with a needle and thread, hanging them to dry, and then sealing them in jars until they were ready to be rehydrated and cooked. They are called leather britches because the dried beans look like leather that has gotten wet, then dried out.
Record #:
35692
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Abstract:
A dance, originating in Appalachia and blend of Western European and Cherokee influences, had made a comeback. Its present popularity could be seen in counties such as Henderson, whose own Blue Ridge Mountain Dancers performed at the New York World’s Fair in 1964.
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Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 6 Issue 6, Nov/Dec 1978, p11-12
Record #:
36967
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Abstract:
Folktales often come from events done by local characters; fools or jesters in their respective communities often represented the archetypal stories that are still talked about today. The subjects of these stories played an active role in the social landscape and were celebrated for acting a fool.
Record #:
36543
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Abstract:
Women have been included in anthropological studies of serpent-handling, but no past research has focused specifically and solely on the experiences of the women who practice this tradition, nor has it been collected by a female researcher. Interviews with the women demonstrate that experiences, actual roles in church life, and accounts will vary from person to person, from church to church, and from state to state.