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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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5 results for Molasses
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Record #:
3081
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When sugar was scarce, too expensive, or rationed during wartime, many Carolinians made molasses for use as sweeteners. The Sapp family of the Concord/Rockwell area continues the tradition today.
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Record #:
8981
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The molasses mill in Cleveland County is one of the few places left in North Carolina where molasses is made. Fitzhugh McMurry's mill has been in operation for over a century. This year, McMurry planted fifteen acres of sugar cane and is expecting a yield of about six hundred gallons of molasses. McMurry begins making his molasses in mid-September, and has customers as far away as California come to purchase it.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 48 Issue 4, Sept 1980, p8-9, 12, il
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Record #:
22643
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The community of Todd, North Carolina have gathered to harvest and boil sorghum for molasses for the past thirty-six yeas. Like many other communities in Watauga County, the molasses boil has been a part of the Appalachian agricultural practice and community traditions for centuries.
Record #:
31348
Author(s):
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Rob Kimmons makes “finger-licking good” molasses at his Rockingham County farm near Mayodan. According to Kimmons, a full grown half-acre field of sugar cane will produce enough syrup to make about one-hundred gallons of molasses. This article describes Kimmons’ molasses business and the process of making molasses.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 17 Issue 9, Sept 1985, p24-25, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
35902
Author(s):
Abstract:
Among the states providing syrup was North Carolina, through makers such as Franklin County’s Joe Wheeler. Making syrup entailed a refining that started with cane fodder and ended with juice cooked for the right amount of time.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 8, Oct 1980, p8