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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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10 results for Dance
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Record #:
4030
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Dance Festival, now in its eighth year, was held in January, 1999, at Meredith College in Raleigh. The festival affords the state's dancers and choreographers an opportunity to display their artistic skills and creations.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 17 Issue 3, Jan 1999, p31, il Periodical Website
Record #:
11739
Abstract:
Two important forums of the performing arts are coming to Duke University, the American Musical Theater Center and the American Dance Festival. The festival had been in residence at Connecticut College for thirty years. Duke was chosen over forty-six other campuses competing for the dance festival.
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Record #:
27024
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Party Illegal is Durham’s longest running electronic dance party, organized by local artists and musicians who work in creative contrast to the privileged tendencies of downtown Durham's current redevelopment. For them, Durham's new identity has repeatedly proven itself to be insensitive to race, class, and gender issues. Party Illegal addresses most of those through something as seemingly simple as a monthly dance party.
Source:
Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 33 Issue 7, Feb 2016, p18-19, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
27202
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Abstract:
Culture Mill is a well-established force in the Triangle’s artistic life, whether presenting dance shows at the Carrack in Durham or Trust the Bus in Saxapahaw. They have hosted and collaborated with a number of international independent artists. This weekend, Culture Mill is featuring an Australian dance company performing in the Trust the Bus series.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 33 Issue 24, June 2016, p22, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
27198
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This year’s American Dance Festival in Durham features performances that focus on gender and politics. Among the shows, Sara Juli helps us look and laugh at big topics we don’t really discuss. Rosie Herrera’s Carne Viva examines power’s roots in our conceptions of faith and romance.
Source:
Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 33 Issue 24, June 2016, p16, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
34865
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Roland’s dance studio in Fayetteville, offers North Carolinians a unique experience—Scottish dance classes. Originally created for male warriors as a form of calisthenics, Scottish dance today is more frequently performed by female dancers. The studio, interested in expanding their offerings, reached out in 2015 to a local instructor who specialized in the dance. Fayetteville itself has a longer history of Scottish dance—a club was formed at Fayetteville High School during the 1950s to celebrate the State’s Scottish immigrants.
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CityView (NoCar F 264.T3 W4), Vol. Issue , March/April 2016, p68-71, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
35242
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As a family tradition that involved dancing and a local fall festival, everyone in the Felicia White and Vanessa Farabee families is talented, whether it’s because of fancy foot moves or farm float decoration.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 48 Issue 11, November 2016, p20
Record #:
35692
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A dance, originating in Appalachia and blend of Western European and Cherokee influences, had made a comeback. Its present popularity could be seen in counties such as Henderson, whose own Blue Ridge Mountain Dancers performed at the New York World’s Fair in 1964.
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Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 6 Issue 6, Nov/Dec 1978, p11-12
Record #:
36887
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Abstract:
Clogging in North Carolina originated in the western counties, but grew as college students took it up from seeing it at folk festivals. The Green Grass Cloggers were comprised of ECU students who won over audiences with their casual dress and spirited way of dancing.
Record #:
39443
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Abstract:
Brewer is a youth leader for the Lumbee tribe, teaching traditional cultural aspects such as song, dance, music, crafts, games, and more.