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14 results for Gettysburg, Battle of, Pa., 1863
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Record #:
3756
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The Battle of Gettysburg was the largest battle fought in North America. Tar Heel troops made up thirty-two regiments, and one in every four soldiers lost in the fighting was from the state.
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Record #:
4329
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In 1881, French artist Paul Phillipoteaux painted the Battle of Gettysburg Cyclorama. It is the world's largest oil painting, measuring 376 feet long and 22 feet high. Wake Forest University now owns the painting and stores it in Clemmons, North Carolina. State Senator Ham Horton of Winston-Salem feels the painting would be a great tourist attraction and got $50,000 from the 1999 General Assembly to do a feasibility study on assembling the painting in suitable surroundings as a tourist attraction.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 57 Issue 10, Oct 1999, p8, il, por
Record #:
10169
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The year 2008 marks the 145th anniversary of the Battle of Gettysburg. Thirty-three North Carolina regiments containing over 12,000 soldiers fought there. Hodge describes three of the regiments--the 26th, 6th, and 55th.
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Record #:
12570
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Unveiled on 3 July 1929, and dedicated by Salisbury native, Walter Murphy, the memorial honoring the men from North Carolina who fought and died during the Civil War was erected at Gettysburg.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 34 Issue 3, July 1966, p11-12, il
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Record #:
15226
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North Carolina claims to have been first at Bethel, furthest at Gettysburg, last at Appomattox. It cannot be questioned that Henry Wyatt of Edgecombe was first to fall at Bethel, or that the brigade of William R. Cox made the last charge at Appomattox, but what of the claim that North Carolina's troops were furthest at Gettysburg? North Carolina troops brought on that battle for on June 29, 1863, Heth's division reached Cashtown, from which points he sent forward the North Carolina brigade of Pettigrew to Gettysburg in search of supplies. Pettigrew found the town occupied by Federal cavalry, and its environs became the theater of the three days battle which ensued.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 7 Issue 20, Oct 1939, p4, 22
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Record #:
20300
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North Carolinians participated wholeheartedly both in the American Civil war and in the Gettysburg campaign. At Gettysburg, 770 North Carolina soldiers were killed in action, a loss greater than any other states.
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Record #:
23725
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Miles discusses the suffering and loss of North Carolina's regiments during the battle of Gettysburg.
Record #:
24596
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A mural that depicts the Battle of Gettysburg is portrayed on a canvas that is 410 feet long. The author discusses the artist’s methods of production and inspirations for creating such large works of art.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 32 Issue 22, April 1965, p10-12, 31, il
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Record #:
22013
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An account of the third day of battle at Gettysburg with some quoted details provided by soldiers from North Carolina.
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Record #:
22551
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It is argued that the term 'Pickett's Charge,' referring to the movements of General George Pickett during the Battle of Gettysburg during the American Civil War, is actually a misnomer. As Pickett only commanded 3 brigades and 15 regiments, the phrase should give attention to General Longstreet, whose command led the charge according to official reports.
Record #:
32239
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The late Chief Justice Walter Clarke gives a detailed description of the part North Carolina’s troops played in the battle of Gettysburg. This article is the second part of a piece published in The North Carolina Booklet.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 26 Issue 13, Nov 1958, p11-12, il
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Record #:
32238
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Abstract:
The late Chief Justice Walter Clarke gives a detailed description of the part North Carolina’s troops played in the battle of Gettysburg. This article is the first part of a piece published in The North Carolina Booklet.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 26 Issue 12, Nov 1958, p13-14, il
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Record #:
32380
Author(s):
Abstract:
The late Chief Justice Walter Clarke gives a detailed description of the part North Carolina’s troops played in the battle of Gettysburg. This article is the final part of a piece published in The North Carolina Booklet.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 26 Issue 14, Nov 1958, p13-14
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Record #:
37894
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Abstract:
This battle's carnage is measured in more than Union and Confederate casualties. Included by the author were the destruction of the 26th North Carolina Regiment as a formidable force. Attesting to Gettysburg’s destruction included 28,000 Confederate dead or wounded, 2,935 of whom were buried in Virginia’s Hollywood Cemetery. The large number of North Carolina soldiers killed, one in four of total forces, helped to usher in a peace movement yielding 100 rallies and increased division between the Secessionists and Unionists.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 81 Issue 8, Jan 2014, p132-134, 136-140 Periodical Website