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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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6 results for Indians of North America--Politics and government
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Record #:
4336
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 1995, Jean Dugan was elected principal chief of the Eastern Band of Cherokees. She is the first woman to hold the position. Dugan restructured the tribal government and established stringent financial controls. Her predecessor was impeached on charges of misusing funds. In the fall 1999 election, she was upset in her bid for reelection.
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Record #:
9330
Author(s):
Abstract:
Native American tribes such as the Sioux, Algonquian, Catawba, and Cherokee, contrary to popular belief, exhibited very democratic governing practices according to early accounts written by John Lawson from 1700 and 1701. By Lawson's accounts, most tribes possessed a hierarchy of leaders rather than one single leader.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 42 Issue 2, July 1974, p21, 32-33, il, por
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Record #:
10806
Author(s):
Abstract:
Among North Carolina's 100 counties and 650 cities and towns, there is one \"dependent sovereignty\" with a Principal Chief. The sovereignty is the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians, proprietors of a 56,000-acre Western North Carolina wooded realm. The Principal Chief is Walter Jackson, born a Cherokee in 1924 and promoted by his fellow tribesmen in 1967 to the highest distinction an Indian can attain. Siler discusses the state's most unusual form of government and how it functions.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 36 Issue 17, Feb 1969, p8-10, il, por
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Record #:
19886
Abstract:
Benjamin Hawkins was born on August 15, 1754 in Bute County. He was a prominent public servant, representing the state both in the Continental Congress and United States Senate. This article covers but his time as a United States Indian Agent amongst the Creek Tribe throughout the Southeast. In part one of two, the author looks at Hawkins' life including childhood, family details, early Congressional career, and his appointments to numerous boards concerning Native American relations.
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Record #:
19890
Abstract:
Continuation of the article printed in the January 1942 edition which elaborates on the career of Colonel Benjamin Hawkins. In part II, the Colonel's actions and responsibilities as an agent to the Cherokees, Choctaws, Creeks, and Chickasaws of western North Carolina and northwestern Georgia is further explained and the degree of his success in executing these duties.
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Record #:
7676
Abstract:
In 1971, the North Carolina Commission of Indian Affairs was created. The purpose of the commission is to advocate for Indian communities, tribes, and organizations, and to bring together local, state, and federal money and other resources that can help.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 45 Issue 1, Fall 2005, p20-22, il, map