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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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21 results for Ceramics--Prehistoric
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Record #:
18591
Abstract:
Site 31CB114 is a prehistoric site located on the broad ridgetop south of the Cape Fear River in Columbus County. The ceramics at the site represent a mixture of decorative and technological attributes typically found within the North and South Carolina Coastal Plain. Radiocarbon dating concludes that the production of ceramics at this site occurred as much as 1500 years earlier than previously expected for the southern Coastal Plain of North Carolina.
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Record #:
20367
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Excavations near Hamps's Landing on the Lower Cape Fear River in New Hanover County have revealed a previously undefined type of ceramics. The limestone-tempered, fabric-pressed sherds have, until now, been unidentified in coastal North Carolina.
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North Carolina Archaeology (NoCar E 78 S55 S6), Vol. 46 Issue , Oct 1997, p91-108, il, map, bibl Periodical Website
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Record #:
20376
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Archaeological work done at the Marine Corps Auxiliary Landing Field (MCALF) Bogue, at Taylor Bay on the mainland side of Bogue Sound in Carteret County has unearthed a change in prehistoric ceramic chronology for coastal North Carolina, presenting a possible new ceramic type for the region.
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North Carolina Archaeology (NoCar E 78 S55 S6), Vol. 49 Issue , Oct 2000, p78-92, il, map, bibl Periodical Website
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Record #:
31587
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This brief comparison of ceramics from the Hollywood mounds with ceramics from the Town Creek mound in North Carolina emphasizes similarities in the physical appearance of the pottery and in the presence of an urn-burial complex at both sites. Material from upper levels at the Hollywood mounds is described as showing striking resemblances to the material from Town Creek. The Lower levels at Hollywood possess "Southern Cult'' material not duplicated at Town Creek, where "Southern Cult" influence is minor.
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Record #:
35120
Abstract:
This article contains an analysis of the authors' excavation from sites at the Piedmont region between the Archaic to Woodland periods by Coastal Carolina Research Inc. Their analysis included geoarchaeological methods such as radioactive carbon dating, soil taxonomy, and geological descriptive methods. Include were figures containing statistical measures, excavation site views, and images of artifacts, as well as tables containing strata data.
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Record #:
35122
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In 2000, excavation teams from East Carolina University returned to this area after a twenty plus year absence. Examined were the area’s early and middle Holocene chronology, typology, and geoarchaeology of the middle to late Archaic periods. Data was gathered through sedimentology, site formations, and mapping and shovel testing of the sand ridge. Recovered were flakes and sherds of ceramics and stone tools. Complementing the qualitative data were figures detailing sherd and site images. Tables contained data related to ceramic types and sample sizes for tool flakes and sherds.
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Record #:
35123
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This project was undertaken to deepen the understanding of Deep Creek ceramics from the early Woodland period, established by archaeological excavations at the Northern Coastal Plain’s Parker and Barber Creeks by David Phelps (1975, 1977, 1983). Methodology employed during this site work involved surface treatment and temper analyses of sherds. A conclusion drawn from analyses was a consistency between wares recovered and ceramic artifacts dating from this period. Data was represented in figures featuring images of the sherds from these sites and tables depicting temper size, abundance, and inclusions.
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Record #:
35116
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Mary Fitts’ article covered the relationships facilitated between the American Indians groups residing in the Central Piedmont region between the sixteenth and first half of the eighteenth century. Highlighted were similar challenges the groups encountered. An examination of one of the groups inhabiting this region, the Catawba, involved factors such as their name’s possible origins, differences in class, social differences, and reasons for their becoming a confederacy of nations. With regards to their pottery, included were four tables and ten figures related to the locations and types. Their locations in this regions were revealed in three maps (see figures 2, 4, and 5), as well as locations for the archaeological expeditions (see figures 3 and 5).
Record #:
35121
Abstract:
Between 2001-2007, pottery from the early middle, and late Qualla periods was excavated from Tennessee Valley’s Coweeta Creek in Southwestern NC. Credited by the author as one of the first analytical comparisons of these ceramic styles, this article contains an analysis of cultural artifacts, Cherokee settlements, and lifeways of prehistoric and historic Cherokee groups. Also discussed were the Qualla ceramic series, sherd samples, and temporal differences between sherds. Images of and quantitative data for these sherds can be found in the figures and tables.
Record #:
35118
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Abstract:
The arrow heads, discovered in the 1960s, were discussed fully for the first time. Their fluted points, classified as Clovis or Redstone, were examined in terms of physical appearance and significance as a Paleoindian artifact. Particular significance noted by I. Randolph Daniel are the fluted points’ unrefined typological points; discovery from a single site; and evidence for the raw material not originating in NC. Included are a table with measurements and figure with images.
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Record #:
35197
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As an introduction to this periodical series of articles, Herbert discussed William Haag, an archaeologist who completed an excavation series of coastal sites between 1954-1955. His endeavor paved the road for several future archaeological related activities in Coastal NC. Highlighted was his descriptions of testing and surveying sites along the northern coast of North Carolina. His work laid a foundation for the prehistoric ceramic sequence still in use at the time of this journal’s publication. Also noted among his contributions to the field was a symposium organized for the fifty fifth annual Southern Archaeological Conference. This Conference yielded six of the articles published in this volume.
Record #:
35201
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John Byrd’s examination of ceramic assemblage from the Davenport site, located in Bertie County along the Pamlico River, proposed possible similarities between those ceramics and three others gathered in Northeastern NC. Temporal patterns in paste temper and surface were used to determine similarities. From his assessment of the Davenport data, which uncovered a ceramic series deposited earlier than expected, Byrd proposed that the cultural-historical framework standard for these ceramic series needed to be refined.
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Record #:
35199
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The author deliberated the proper taxonomic sequence of ceramic series such as Oak Island, White Oak, Cape Creek, Thom’s Creek, Cape Fear, Hanover, and Papanow. Factors considered in the determination of actual dates that these ceramic series appeared included temper and surface. Radiocarbon and thermoluminescence dating methods determined which Woodland period these ceramic series appeared. Several figures identified the NC coastal counties containing these sites or featured images of ceramic sherds.
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Record #:
35198
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Abstract:
This article chronicled Stanley South’s excavation at Oak Island in 1960, with comparisons made between South’s excavation and others done in Northeastern NC (notably by Haag, Phelps, Loftfield, and Hargrove). These comparisons collectively chronicled the differences in ceramics, pottery, and stone weaponry for excavations sites such as Oak Island, White Island, and Hamp’s Landings. From this, Mathis surmised that the established Oak Island nomenclature system be substituted by the newly defined Hamp’s Landing series.
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Record #:
35200
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Abstract:
Adam Marshall discussed newly discovered types of interior impressions for ceramics, distinct and uninform interval fabric impressed. Based on the collected data, the author concluded that previously undetected typological relationships between the White Oak and Colington ceramic series could be determined.
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