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8 results for Ceramics--Colonial
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Record #:
21880
Abstract:
This article examines a rare group of 'Liverpool-Type' transfer-printed creamware and pearlware pitchers or 'jugs' made for known individuals in the Pamlico and Albemarle Sound areas of eastern North Carolina dating between 1795 and 1810.
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Record #:
35121
Abstract:
Between 2001-2007, pottery from the early middle, and late Qualla periods was excavated from Tennessee Valley’s Coweeta Creek in Southwestern NC. Credited by the author as one of the first analytical comparisons of these ceramic styles, this article contains an analysis of cultural artifacts, Cherokee settlements, and lifeways of prehistoric and historic Cherokee groups. Also discussed were the Qualla ceramic series, sherd samples, and temporal differences between sherds. Images of and quantitative data for these sherds can be found in the figures and tables.
Record #:
35203
Abstract:
Beaman’s intent was the determine whether the normative frequency ranges of the Carolina artifact patterns were sufficient to accommodate the upper class lifestyle of Tryon Palace, the home of Loyalist governors such as Josiah Martin and William Tryon. Factors used to determine this possibility were an examination of the Palace’s artifact groups and individual artifacts. Beaman’s conclusion was that many of these artifact groups deviated from the expected normative ranges. Furniture, Personal, and Tobacco Pipe groups were beyond the range, while the Kitchen and Clothing groups were below the range. Only the Architecture, Arms, and Activities fell within the anticipated normative ranges.
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Record #:
35202
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Abstract:
Though Dane Magoon’s article discussed six types of pipes—English, Native American, “Chesapeake,” Jordan’s Landing, Croatan, and Neoheroka Fort—emphasis was placed on “Chesapeake.” Noted about the “Chesapeake,” primarily produced by Native Americans: theoretical interpretations for their West African affiliation, distinguishing features and artistic decorations; recovery locations; and an explanation for enclosing the name in quotation marks. Included were seven figures, with five of these figures showing photos of the pipes, one displaying the three excavation sites, and one containing drawings of Jordan’s Landing pipes.
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Record #:
35211
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Andrew Madsen's article chronicled the findings of “The Road to Hope” excavation at Hope Plantation in Bertie County, occupied during the nineteenth century by the David Stone family. Undertaken in 2001-2002 by Coastal Carolina Research Inc., this study sought to better comprehend slaves’ retention of African cultural beliefs and practices within the development of a North Carolinian Creolized culture. This goal was met through the examination of Colonoware ceramic fragments, which were also compared to recoveries from Virginia and South Carolina Plantation sites.
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Record #:
35210
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This article’s discussion of cultural behaviors of smoking in Southeastern NC Colonial society and culture built from articles written about fifteen excavations between the 1960s to the present. Discussion of the recent excavation work at Brunswick Town focused on new discoveries of white clay pipe fragments uncovered. This encouraged a reevaluation starting in 1997 of earlier findings, done through the use of methods such as regression formulas and pipe stem dating.
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Record #:
35209
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This article examined the warfare strategy Catawba employed to keep their cultural identity intact in the midst of English colonization and contact with these settlers. Described by the author as “ethnic soldiers,” this strategy yielded their place as highly valued military auxiliaries. Highlighted were activities that assured this value: assisting in curbing slave rebellions; fighting with British troops during the Revolutionary, Mexican-American, and Civil Wars.
Record #:
35208
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Abstract:
Mark Plane’s study examined the Catawba’s resilience during their contact with English settlers throughout the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. In addition to adopting many cultural practices, this Native American group was able to keep its cultural identity intact. What the author focuses on, though, are the English cultural practices the Catawba adopted, reflected in the changes in their ceramics and eating habits. Underscored was the role that strategic alliances with the British through trade played in these social and cultural adoptions.
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