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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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3 results for Catawba Indians--North Carolina--Pottery
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Record #:
18627
Author(s):
Abstract:
Although the Catawba Nation of Indians is dispersed across the United States and part of Mexico, remnants of their once consolidated culture remain in arenas such pottery, where Catawba potters still produce distinctive pieces.
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Record #:
35209
Author(s):
Abstract:
This article examined the warfare strategy Catawba employed to keep their cultural identity intact in the midst of English colonization and contact with these settlers. Described by the author as “ethnic soldiers,” this strategy yielded their place as highly valued military auxiliaries. Highlighted were activities that assured this value: assisting in curbing slave rebellions; fighting with British troops during the Revolutionary, Mexican-American, and Civil Wars.
Record #:
35117
Abstract:
In 2002-2003, Brent Riggs, R.P. Stephen Davis, and Mark Plane, archaeologists from the University of North Carolina, discovered Catawba pottery from the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries in New Town, South Carolina. Highlighted aspects of their discovery included this pottery’s characteristics, assemblage, production and trade. Also noted was this research’s significance and implications for the Colonoware debate. Figures feature location sites, shards or vessels images, and burnishing stones that aided in Catawba pottery’s production.