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58 results for North Carolina Archaeology
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Record #:
4428
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In 1794, John Beam bought land in what is now Cleveland County and began farming. The family would farm the property, now on the National Register of Historic Places, for over 100 years. The authors describe the site's architectural and archaeological features, look at the placement of the farmstead on the Piedmont landscape, and describe farm changes during the 100 years of Beam family ownership.
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4426
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In 1958, Brunswick Town was rediscovered and excavations began shortly thereafter. Research at the site between 1958 and 1968 contributed to Brunswick Town's becoming a State Historic Site. The authors summarize the decade's archaeological investigations, their significance, and their importance in the archaeological history of the state.
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Record #:
4427
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Lowder's Ferry, a prehistoric archaeological site, was discovered in 1948, during grading of a parking lot. The site is located at Marrow Mountain State Park in Stanly County. Using Joffre Coe's unpublished 1949 field notes, Drye reconstructs the site's structure and reevaluates the sequence of the discovered projectile points.
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Record #:
8451
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On May 29, 1664, colonists arrived in what is now Brunswick County to establish a town. Most of the arrivals were English. They chose a site on a low knoll at the mouth of Town Creek, a large tributary of the Lower Cape Fear River. Considerations in selecting this site would have included navigation, anchorage, defense, and centrality of position within the colony. The settlement was intended to be an agricultural one. By the fall of 1667, the colony was abandoned. Forces far removed from the colony contributed to its decline, including failure to obtain essential patents and charters from the king and lords proprietors, England�s war with Holland, and internal squabbles among the colony�s backers. Loftfield discusses what excavations reveal about the colony.
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Record #:
8450
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McReynolds investigates the distribution of 35,079 Archaic and Woodland projectile points recovered in the state. The distribution of the points by cultural period and region indicates that the Piedmont was more heavily exploited throughout prehistory than the mountains or coastal plain. The distribution also reveals specific preferences for materials in making the points.
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North Carolina Archaeology (NoCar E 78 S55 S6), Vol. 54 Issue , Oct 2005, p1-33, il, map, bibl Periodical Website
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Record #:
18591
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Site 31CB114 is a prehistoric site located on the broad ridgetop south of the Cape Fear River in Columbus County. The ceramics at the site represent a mixture of decorative and technological attributes typically found within the North and South Carolina Coastal Plain. Radiocarbon dating concludes that the production of ceramics at this site occurred as much as 1500 years earlier than previously expected for the southern Coastal Plain of North Carolina.
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Record #:
18592
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In the Sandhills and southern Coastal Plain of North Carolina, a sand burial mound traditional emerged in the Woodland period. These mounds and the collective mortuary practice they represent are not well understood in North Carolina. This article discusses work at Fort Bragg and the social context for this tradition.
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North Carolina Archaeology (NoCar E 78 S55 S6), Vol. 48 Issue , Oct 1999, p59-86, map, bibl, f Periodical Website
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Record #:
18593
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From 1952 to 1958, Morley Jeffers Williams conducted extensive archaeological investigations at Tryon Palace in New Bern. These excavations provided information that guided the interior and exterior restoration and reconstruction of the buildings and other architectural features.
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Record #:
18594
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Prehistoric mining activity in the Blue Ridge Mountains during the Woodland period is a neglected aspect of North Carolina history. Abundant evidence was still visible in the early 20th-century before it was destroyed by modern mining activity. This article presents an introductory study of mica mining at the Sink Hole Mica Mine in Bandana, North Carolina.
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Record #:
18608
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Archaeology and geography staff and students from the University of North Carolina at Greensboro used multidisciplinary research to explore the occupation of Tannenbaum Historic Park in Greensboro from the American Revolution to the present. The Park is part of the Guilford Courthouse Battlefield National Historic Landmark and is believed to be the location where General Cornwallis formed the first British line of attack which proceeded into the current Guilford Courthouse National Military Park.
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North Carolina Archaeology (NoCar E 78 S55 S6), Vol. 52 Issue , Oct 2003, p20-52, map, bibl, f Periodical Website
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Record #:
18607
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Native American archaeological sites post-dating A.D. 1450 are rare in the Appalachian Summit of northwestern North Carolina, which includes Allegheny, Ashe, Avery, and Watauga counties. The only confirmed sites at high elevations provide evidence that climate change allowed agriculture above 2,500ft after A.D. 900, human settlement was restricted to individual households, and permanent settlement was restricted after 1450.
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Record #:
18604
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Between 1999 and 2001, approximately 84,000 faunal specimens from seven excavated sites along the Roanoke River Basin in North Carolina and Virginia were cataloged and analyzed. The purpose of the study was to provide information to U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to develop fishery management plans and restoration plans for endangered species through studying this historic distribution and abundance of fish and other animals in the basin.
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Record #:
18606
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Within the southern Piedmont of North Carolina are a number of streams and springs as well as a temperate climate. During the latter half of the 19th century there arose an interest in homeopathic medicine and related cures. Principal among these was healing spring and water treatments. Local entrepreneurs built a hotel/resort in western Gaston County to cater to an increasingly homeopathic and affluent local populace. Archaeological surveys have identified foundations associated with the resort, as well as artifacts.
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North Carolina Archaeology (NoCar E 78 S55 S6), Vol. 51 Issue , Oct 2002, p68-97, map, bibl, f Periodical Website
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Record #:
18605
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Milton Perry conducted the first archaeological research at Fort Macon as part of the 1952-1953 restoration project. Perry's investigations are compared with subsequent archaeological projects at Fort Macon State Park and show the relevance of archaeological contributions to the study of the Civil War.
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Record #:
18626
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Ethnographic documents suggest that the total population of the Catawba Indians declined from 1700 to 1850 but then increased again over the next one hundred years. Sources reveal that while European-introduced diseases were among determinants of Catawba population change, emigration and other factors may have been significant.
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