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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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6 results for Daniel, I. Randolph
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Record #:
18661
Author(s):
Abstract:
Archaeological investigations of prehistoric rhyolite quarries in the Uwharrie Mountains of North Carolina have developed systematic databases of rhyolite variability allowing others to source stone tool assemblages from North Carolina and surrounding areas.
Source:
Southern Indian Studies (NoCar E 78.S55 S6), Vol. 45 Issue , Oct 1996, p1-37, map, bibl, f Periodical Website
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Record #:
18673
Author(s):
Abstract:
This volume discusses archaeological investigations surrounding the historic Occaneechi settlement visited by John Lawson in 1701, near Hillsborough. Researches examine pottery, historic artifacts, faunal remains, plant remains, burials, and structures.
Source:
Southern Indian Studies (NoCar E 78.S55 S6), Vol. 36-37 Issue , Oct 1988, p1-128, map, bibl, f Periodical Website
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Record #:
18679
Author(s):
Abstract:
Daniel examines the sample of unifacial stone tools discovered at the Hardaway site in Stanly County as a unique assemblage with its own typology.
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Record #:
7691
Author(s):
Abstract:
English settlers arrived in North Carolina in the 1500s. Native Americans arrived 10,000 years before. They left no written accounts, so what is known of their activities is derived through investigations by archaeologists. Native American prehistory in the state is divided into four time periods: Paleo-Indian, Archaic, Woodland, and Contact. This article examines what is known of the Paleo-Indian Period.
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Record #:
35118
Author(s):
Abstract:
The arrow heads, discovered in the 1960s, were discussed fully for the first time. Their fluted points, classified as Clovis or Redstone, were examined in terms of physical appearance and significance as a Paleoindian artifact. Particular significance noted by I. Randolph Daniel are the fluted points’ unrefined typological points; discovery from a single site; and evidence for the raw material not originating in NC. Included are a table with measurements and figure with images.
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Record #:
35122
Abstract:
In 2000, excavation teams from East Carolina University returned to this area after a twenty plus year absence. Examined were the area’s early and middle Holocene chronology, typology, and geoarchaeology of the middle to late Archaic periods. Data was gathered through sedimentology, site formations, and mapping and shovel testing of the sand ridge. Recovered were flakes and sherds of ceramics and stone tools. Complementing the qualitative data were figures detailing sherd and site images. Tables contained data related to ceramic types and sample sizes for tool flakes and sherds.
Subject(s):