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10 results for Pottery--North Carolina
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Record #:
17790
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Three places in North Carolina claim to be the original Jugtown--a true testament to the tradition of pottery in the state.
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Record #:
24462
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D.K. Clay Ltd. in Clayton is at least one of the largest and most successful pottery studios in North Carolina. The business has two large production kilns, 10,000 square feet of historic building, three full-time potters, and multiple other staff people.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 58 Issue 7, December 1990, p17-19, il
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Record #:
29243
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A selection of Jugtown pottery from the Museum’s permanent collection will be on display in the North Carolina Gallery this summer. Jugtown Pottery was established in the 1920s by Jacques and Juliana Royster Busbee in an attempt to revive the dying folk craft. Under the Busbees’ direction, potters of Moore County refined the traditional shapes and glazes of the pottery. As a result, the art form flourished and a major market was created for the pottery in New York.
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Preview (NoCar Oversize N 715 R2 A26), Vol. Issue , Spring 1984, p7-8
Record #:
29262
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This is a guide to North Carolina’s most notable potteries in the Piedmont, from Seagrove to Robins in lower Randolph and upper Moore Counties. Seven potteries are featured, each using traditional pottery techniques, local clays, and a variety of materials.
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Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 9, Nov 1980, p24-25, por, map
Record #:
29709
Author(s):
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Mica, a cooperative, artist-run gallery in Bakersville, North Carolina, brings together well-respected potters from Yancey and Mitchell counties, each creating distinctive work. The pottery at Mica makes it possible to stylize a meal using locally made ceramic dishes and drinking vessels.
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Record #:
35113
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This article was a lead in for “The Last of the Iroquois Potters,” M.R. Harrington’s 1909 study of traditional Cherokee ceramics produced during the Qualla periods in what is now Cherokee, NC. Brett Riggs and Christopher Rodning’s article focused on other archaeologists from Harrington’s time and characteristic features of pottery produced particularly during the Qualla periods. Also noted were other discoveries of Iroquois pottery in Southeast regions such as Georgia and the continuation of this pottery’s production into the twenty first century.
Record #:
35119
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Edmond Boudreaux chronicled an updated ceramic development of the Town Creek Region, needed in light of the area’s extensive excavation history. Parts of this chronology included a description of the South Appalachian Mississippian Tradition, the six steps of the ceramic analysis for the author’s research, the use of multiple seriation methods, earlier research by Oliver (1992) proposing the groups of pottery fell into three ceramic phases. The excavation’s sites, typology for the pottery, and Ford seriation graphs were featured in figures. Tables contained seriation data and Mississippi period radiocarbon dates. Pottery images were located in Appendix A.
Record #:
35114
Author(s):
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This was M.R. Harrington’s account of the discovery of Iroquois pottery surviving among the Eastern Cherokee, uncovered during his 1908-1909 expedition. Focused upon were the three principle forms of pottery characteristic of the Eastern Cherokee. Also discussed were three Eastern Cherokee women playing an active role in keeping the tradition alive, its production process, and similarities between Eastern Cherokee and New York Iroquois pottery.
Record #:
37413
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A close examination was offered to three of the Palace's recent acquisitions. These were Eastern Piedmont pottery from the 19th and 20th centuries; manuscript collections from Judge William J. Gaston, whose accomplishments include penning “The Old North State”; a map of the Battle of New Bern, a 1900 blueprint copy of a map drawn by an unidentified Union soldier.
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The Palace (NoCar F 264 N5 P3), Vol. 12 Issue 1, Winter 2013/2014, p6-7
Record #:
38292
Author(s):
Abstract:
Diane Aurit’s face jug collection and financial investment grows in tandem with her fascination with the history, the process behind their creation, and varieties of facial design. Famed face jug potters represented in her collection of 240 jars include Charlie Lisk, Don Craig, Burlon Craig, Kim Ellington, Steven Abee, and Joe Reinhardt.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 78 Issue 11, Apr 2011, p120-122, 124, 126 Periodical Website