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22 results for Tuscarora Indians, Eastern--Wars, 1711-1713
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Record #:
10443
Abstract:
The Tuscarora War, 1711-1713, was confined to a large area in eastern North Carolina that, at the time, was known as Bath County. A map drawn after the war depicts the routes traveled by forces allied against the Tuscarora. The map was thought to have been drawn by Colonel James Moore between 1722 and 1728. The original document is in the British Museum.
Source:
We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 23 Issue 10, Mar 1966, p15-17, 30, il, map
Record #:
10441
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Tuscarora War raged off and on for a year and a half in eastern North Carolina. The war began with a general massacre of while settlers in Bath County on September 21, 1711, and ended with the four day battle at Fort Neoheroka, March 20-23, 1713. Over 600 whites and Indians were killed there. Holloman recounts the events.
Source:
We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 23 Issue 7, Dec 1965, p15-18, 30, 32, il, map
Record #:
10442
Author(s):
Abstract:
Using an old handmade map, ca. 1710 or 1711, of eastern North Carolina, Holloman identifies and provides a brief description of Tuscarora Indian towns.
Source:
We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 23 Issue 9, Feb 1966, p16-17, 29-30, map
Record #:
13128
Author(s):
Abstract:
This article by the late Chief Justice, was first published in the \"North Carolina Booklet,\" July, 1902. Many reasons were assigned as to why bloody outbreak of Indians occurred in 1711 including, the steady encroachment of whites on hunting grounds, conflicts between whites themselves, or instigation by outside parties. The Indians could muster quite a number of men and were lead mostly by the Tuscaroras on the 22nd of September.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 23 Issue 12, Nov 1955, p9-11, 24, il
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Record #:
15490
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolinians celebrated the first Thanksgiving on September 22, 1712. The date was chosen to remember the Tuscarora massacre. This event happened on the same date in 1711 when a Tuscarora attack provoked settlers who retaliated and decimated the Tuscarora tribe around the Pamlico Sound.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 3 Issue 26, Nov 1935, p2, 22
Full Text:
Record #:
19076
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Tuscarora War raged off and on for a year and a half in eastern North Carolina as the Native Americans living in Eastern North Carolina in 1711 fought to regain their independence. It ended with the four day battle at Fort Neoheroka, March 20-23, 1713. Over 600 Tuscarora men, women, and children were killed and 400 taken prisoner. Gery recounts the events.
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Record #:
19819
Author(s):
Abstract:
Colonization of North Carolina was littered with conflict between English settlers and the native population, especially the Tuscarora. The strife between the colonists and the hostile tribes of the Carolinas ended by 1726 as the colonial government and its native allies wiped out their enemies.
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Record #:
21324
Abstract:
A look at the events surrounding the 1711 Tuscarora Iroquois Indians attack of white settlements in North Carolina that sent Christopher Gale to South Carolina to solicit aid, and the subsequent South Carolina funded relief expedition led by Colonel John (later \"Tuscarora Jack\") Barnwell that resulted in a conflict at the Tuscarora village of Torhunta, the liberation of the white settlement of Bath Town, and an attempted to capture Tuscarora chief Hancock at Catechna Creek.
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Record #:
21338
Author(s):
Abstract:
Ripley recounts the reasons for and the results of the violent and rebellious attempt by Native Americans living in Eastern North Carolina in 1711 to regain their independence. The war began with a general massacre of white settlers in Bath County on September 21, 1711, and ended with the four day battle at Fort Neoheroka, March 20-23, 1713. Over 600 whites and Indians were killed there. This period is known as the Tuscarora War.
Source:
Recall (NoCar F 252 .R43), Vol. 7 Issue 2, Fall 2001, p14-20, il, map
Record #:
21421
Abstract:
The Tuscarora Indians have often been viewed by scholars as only being significant to North Carolina during the Tuscarora War between 1711 and 1713. This is not the case as the Tuscarora dominated the region for over a century, first amongst the Indian groups of the region and then when dealing with European colonists. From the late 1500s to their defeat in 1713, the Tuscarora attempted to maintain control over their territory and trading rights in much of eastern North Carolina. Their presence demarcated the extent of English settlement in North Carolina from 1654 to 1712 and may have influenced several internal conflicts among the colonists.
Source:
North Carolina Historical Review (NoCar F251 .N892), Vol. 59 Issue 4, Oct 1982, p307-326 , il, por, map, f Periodical Website
Record #:
22117
Author(s):
Abstract:
This article examines the various Indian tribes of Eastern North Carolina and their interactions with each other and early English colonists. The article also provides additional information regarding the Tuscarora War and how the Indian tribes were affected by its outcome.
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Record #:
16876
Author(s):
Abstract:
Seaman recounts the reasons for and the results of the violent and rebellious attempt by Native Americans living in Eastern North Carolina in 1711 to regain their independence. This period is known as the Tuscarora War.
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Record #:
29246
Author(s):
Abstract:
Two-hundred and eighty years ago in what is now rural Greene County, North Carolina a fort fell after three days of fighting, ending a bloody war. The fort belonged to the Tuscarora Indians and the war was against the American colonists that lasted from 1711 to 1713. This summer, archaeologists from East Carolina University are excavating to determine what remains.
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Record #:
31421
Abstract:
As the last stand of the armed resistance of the Tuscarora Indian Nation in North Carolina, Fort Nohoroco raged in battle for four days before resistance ceased. The battle at Fort Nohoroco brought an end to the Tuscarora War which raged for a year and half in eastern North Carolina.
Source:
We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 23 Issue 7, December 1965, p15-18, 30, il, map
Record #:
31431
Abstract:
In 1711, North Carolina's non-Indian population was only 9500 comprised mostly of German Palatines and Swiss settlers who had arrived to establish a colony on the Trent and Neuse Rivers. The settlers made good progress near New Bern until the Tuscarora Massacre in September 1711. New Bern lay under siege for twenty-two weeks.
Source:
We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 23 Issue 8, January 1966, p21-22, 28-30, il