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9 results for French Broad River
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Record #:
15726
Author(s):
Abstract:
In another excerpt from his 1848 book, Letters from the Alleghenies, Lanman describes his journey down the valley of the French Broad River to the old mineral springs resort.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 22 Issue 22, Mar 1955, p13-14, il
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Record #:
24002
Author(s):
Abstract:
Jack Fisher sought out 756 acres in Madison County in order to create a riverside retreat. This area became French Broad Crossing, which is monitored by the Southeast Regional Conservancy.
Record #:
24003
Author(s):
Abstract:
Asheville's Buncombe Turnpike connected thousands of drovers from Tennessee and North Carolina to South Carolina's railroads. The turnpike provided French Broad River residents with a way to get their herds across the river. Eventually, the West Asheville Bridge was constructed in 1911 to the flood of traffic across the French Broad River.
Record #:
24091
Author(s):
Abstract:
The author discusses the French Broad River's name origins and the various myths surrounding its nomenclature.
Record #:
24105
Abstract:
The author discusses white water rafting in Asheville and talks about the history of French Broad Rafting Expeditions, the oldest rafting company in the area.
Record #:
24683
Author(s):
Abstract:
In an excerpt from ‘Letter from the Alleghany Mountains,’ 1848 traveler Charles Lanman (1819-1895) describes his experience traveling down the valley of the French Broad to Hot Springs.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 22 Issue 22, March 1955, p13-14, il
Full Text:
Record #:
29725
Author(s):
Abstract:
Wilma Dykeman’s first book, The French Broad, was published seven years before Rachel Carson’s Silent Spring. Dykeman’s book is widely credited for bringing needed attention to the polluted state of the French Broad River and its tributary, the Pigeon River. The Center for Cultural Preservation and the Wilma Dykeman Legacy will present a program honoring her work in Western North Carolina.
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Record #:
36546
Author(s):
Abstract:
Offering a “hOMe” away from home is Oshun Mountain Sanctuary, a Queen Anne style mansion turned country inn style retreat center. The twenty-five room facility built in 1889 encouraged holistic well-being and connection with nature through activities such as lectures and lodging options of sanctuary rooms and country cottages. The nonprofit also promoted sustainability of its 41 forest acres through a partnership with Southern Appalachian Highlands Conservancy.
Record #:
36471
Author(s):
Abstract:
Fly fishing and typing have deep roots in the Western North Carolina, according to the author. Theories related to their origins include people such as the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians and places such as southern Appalachia. Bell attributes fishing’s enduring appeal to the lure of its therapeutic effect. Modern efforts to lure more to fishing include the Western North Carolina Fly Fishing Trail in Jackson County. Rivers recommended by the author for fly fishing are Asheville’s French Broad River and Transylvania County’s Davidson River.