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10 results for Plants--Useful
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Record #:
6534
Author(s):
Abstract:
Galax is a little plant with a heart-shaped leaf that grows on mountain slopes in western North Carolina. “Goin' Galackin'” is a mountain term for a trip deep into the mountains to harvest the leaves. Each year millions of these leaves end up in funeral wreaths and Christmas decorations around the country. Five thousand leaves can bring in as much as $12 from a wholesaler. DeLaughter describes the plant, the people who pick them, and ”goin' galackin.'”
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 5, Sept 1979, p43, il
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Record #:
7141
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Arboretum, located on the outskirts of Asheville, contains a unique garden called the Heritage Garden. The garden contains plants that the early Appalachian settlers used to create and enhance the necessities of life. Broomcorn was used by Indians, settlers, and now present-day artisans to make brooms. Marigolds, yarrow, and butterfly weed were sources for natural fabric dyeing.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 11, Apr 2005, p152-155, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
9280
Author(s):
Abstract:
The author remembers living in the mountains as a young girl. Often, when a summer's crop failed to yield enough money for the family, they would search for Galax and Witch Hazel in the woods during the winter. The sale of these two herbs has been a mainstay for mountain families when income has been needed.\r\n
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 47 Issue 7, Dec 1979, p10-11, 38, il, por
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Record #:
15350
Abstract:
\"Gallacking\" was a colloquial term for people who would collect woodland plants for florists. Throughout the Blue Ridge Mountains, people combed the forests for galax leaves, laurel tips, lucotia sprays, and other plants to sell to decorators and florists. The \"gallacker\" could expect to make thirty-five cents per thousand leaves and one shopkeeper estimated that the part-time work provided Appalachian communities with an additional $50,000 in income annually.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 5 Issue 44, Apr 1938, p1, 18, il
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Record #:
28539
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Wild Senna is a plant with a rich history. The plant was used by Native Americans for external skin problems and to treat fevers. It is also used as a laxative and was popular in 19th-century gardens. How to grow the plant, the beneficial pollinators and birds it attracts, and its natural history are explored.
Record #:
31610
Author(s):
Abstract:
Natural dyeing refers to any dye made from vegetable dyes or plant parts. North Carolina claims an abundance of plant materials that can be used for dyeing, including indigo, bloodroot, pokeberry, sassafras, and black walnuts. This article describes which plants produce certain colors, and the processes of making a dyebath, setting the colors, and dyeing wool.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 8 Issue 1, Jan 1976, p14-15, il Periodical Website
Record #:
35294
Author(s):
Abstract:
Used in ceremonial or spiritual contexts, Yaupon was the main ingredient in what was known as the “black drought,” or black drink, in Native American societies.
Record #:
35810
Abstract:
The authors asserted them as a healthy and free supplement to the modern American diet: wild plants. To assure the collection is healthy were books such as Walter Muenscher’s Poisonous Plants of the United States and A Guide to Medicinal Plants of the United States. Helping to concoct a recipe for success were plants that could be eaten raw (dandelions and onions), ones that must be cooked (burdock roots and milkweed), and dishes such as dandelion salad.
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Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 2, Mar/Apr 1979, p48-49
Record #:
36172
Author(s):
Abstract:
Not only can the profiled spices make dishes delicious, their value includes nutritious. Adding thyme, chili pepper, sage, cinnamon, turmeric, and oregano in the daily diet could combat diseases such as cancer and Alzheimer’s. Other health benefits noted: anti-bacterial, anti-fungal, anti-viral, antioxidant, antidepressant, fat burning, cholesterol lowering, and immunity boosting.
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CityView (NoCar F 264.T3 W4), Vol. Issue , January/February 2017, p14-16, 18, 20-23 Periodical Website
Record #:
36200
Abstract:
Essential to garden growth are pollinators, or creatures involved in plant pollination. Examples of insect pollinators are the mason bee and flower fly. Mammal pollinators include hummingbirds. To keep them replenishing the plant supply, the author suggested diversifying the types of flowers by type and shape.
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