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26 results for Medicine--Folklore
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Record #:
15392
Abstract:
Yates provides a list of some of the home remedies which are still being used religiously by hundreds of people in various parts of North Carolina, and other states as well. Some of these remedies include: mare's milk for whooping cough, wear a dime around the neck to prevent painful teething, and Indian flints are good for persons suffering from kidney trouble provided they are boiled in water and the water is drunk regularly.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 4 Issue 3, June 1936, p3, f
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Record #:
16314
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Abstract:
Shaw discusses the life and career of a native North Carolina folk doctor, Cicero West.
Record #:
16320
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Devil's Shoe String is the popular name for a plant growing in the eastern United States. It was believed to provide a cure for the poisonous bite of a rattlesnake when boiled in sweet milk and applied as a poultice.
Record #:
16352
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Several folk cures were discovered at the North Carolina Division of Archives and History among the private papers of John Ashworth of Buncombe County. They include cures for dropsy, scald head, and cancer.
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Record #:
16361
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The literature of folk medicine indicates that for several centuries many folk believed without reservation in the magical power of madstones, supposedly originating as hair or fiber balls in the stomachs of ruminants such as deer, cow, or buffalo. Others were tabasheer, an opal found in the joints of bamboo, while still others were picked in open fields or river beds being associated with halloysite, a clay mineral. These stones were applied to wounds to absorb venom. Clark discusses their ownership, physical origins and characteristics, their uses in treating wounds, their efficacy, and the views of the believers and unbelievers.
Record #:
16357
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This listing is a supplement to Professor Clark's Madstones in North Carolina (presented in North Carolina Folklore Journal March 1976, Vol. 24:1), an exhaustive study of the curious natural stones and stone-like products of the stomachs and gall bladders of animals used in folk medicine.
Record #:
16367
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Abstract:
North Carolina, like most parts of the nation, has inherited much medical folklore from British, European, and other sources. Among the most tenacious early folk medical practices to live on into the 20th-century is the primitive custom of pulling patients through or passing them through holes in trees, stones, or in the earth, or moving them, or causing them to walk, crawl, or creep through a variety of natural or man-made apertures for the curing of disease.
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Record #:
16364
Abstract:
The \"palmer Christian\" or Palma Christi is a palm tree of sorts that happens to grow unexpectedly in Bladen County, North Carolina. The Palma Christi was thought to be a charm against witchcraft and parts of its root could be used to promote quick and easy childbirth.
Record #:
16396
Abstract:
Herb doctors filled a gap in American history when doctors were scarce and expensive. Today the herb doctors are very few and tend to take their secrets with them. In Scotland and Robeson counties of North Carolina herb doctors still work with various herbs in various methods.
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Record #:
16422
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The conjure doctor in eastern North Carolina evolved from a tradition of African voodoo, native Indian practices, and Anglo-American folk healing. The perpetuation of the conjure doctor in the South centralized in areas of low economic and educational standards.
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Record #:
16452
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In an age of capsules and expensive doctors visits, faith healing may be regarded with a doubtful eye. But there are those in the southern Appalachians that claim to be able to cure certain ailments through faith healing.
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Record #:
16458
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When folk medicines are mentioned, most people think only of vegetable products. It is true that the gathering and preparing of leaves, roots, and bark took a large portion of the time of the old-fashioned folk medicine specialists, but many mineral and animal products were always at hand to be used as ready-made medicines or as the base for various mixtures.
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Record #:
16466
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Jones discusses the extensive compendia of folk medical beliefs in North Carolina. These are divided between maintenance, diagnosis, notions, and techniques involved in folk medicine.
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Record #:
16487
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The magical transference of disease is one of the most engaging subjects in the whole fields of folk medicine. Whether found among primitive peoples in remote parts of the world or in 20th-century America, the practice of ridding a person of a disease by transferring the malady to another person, animal, plant, or other various objects rests on sympathetic magic.
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Record #:
16496
Abstract:
For over two hundred years many Southern people have been discovering, rediscovering, and adapting a large variety of medicinal preparations and other homemade articles such as dyes, recipes, and cleaning compounds. Folklore journals, diaries, manuscripts, and medical journals reveal the enormous extent of southern remedial lore.
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