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5 results for Rhododendron
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Record #:
9115
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The Rhododendron Festival was held in Asheville every year from 1928 through 1942 until the start of the Second World War. The week-long festival consisted of five parades, three balls, a pageant, tours, exhibitions, an amateur tennis championship, and boxing matches. Although the festivals drew people from across the country and were wildly successful, no interest has been made in reviving them.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 44 Issue 1, June 1976, p22-23, 66, il
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Record #:
15124
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Craggy Gardens, said to be the largest and loftiest flower gardens in the world, are to become predominant background for western North Carolina future rhododendron festivals. Craggy Gardens is semi-public property, belonging to the United States government and the city of Asheville. While Craggy Gardens have been a mecca for many years for hardy beauty lovers who could scale the deep heights of Craggy Dome, it was not until 1933 that a motor road to the crest allowed more visitors to enjoy the flowers and the view.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 8 Issue 42, Mar 1941, p1, 21
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Record #:
17897
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Topping describes the upcoming Rhododendron Festival which is held in Asheville. Started in 1928, the festival now covers seven entertainment-filled days.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 8 Issue 1, June 1940, p1,19-20, il
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Record #:
165
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Long admired for its dazzling display of rhododendron, Roan Mountain is also a magnificent garden of rare plants left over from the last Ice Age.
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Record #:
29849
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Abstract:
Botanists are attempting to refine the classification of twenty species of native azaleas, which all fall under the scientific genus name of Rhododendron. As their research continues, people can learn about azaleas at the North Carolina Arboretum. The arboretum is home to the National Native Azalea Repository of azaleas representing nearly every species native to the United States, along with many natural hybrids and selections.
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