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8 results for Kornegay, Burt
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Record #:
2360
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State rivers, like the Nantahala, Lumber, and the Waccamaw, provide wilderness canoe campers the opportunity for close contact with nature, or what Henry Thoreau called \"the perfection of travelling.\"
Record #:
1153
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The NC William Bartram Trail memorializes the journeys of William Bartram, a Philadelphia naturalist/botanist who traveled Western NC on botanical expeditions and recorded his favorable impressions of the area.
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Record #:
2613
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Ancient For serious campers who know their woodcraft and respect the natural environment, a commercial camp stove cannot compare to a campfire built with the knowledge of nature's materials.
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Record #:
2736
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A stroke left 20 year-old Henry Tanner physically impaired on his left side. Fighting back, the Raleigh native hiked the length of the 2,158-mile Appalachian Trail as part of his recovery.
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Record #:
3058
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The N.C. Bartram Society, named for naturalist William Bartram, has been building the Bartram Trail, a 70-mile hiking trail in western Carolina, for the last eighteen years. Completion is scheduled for the fall of 1997.
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Record #:
3649
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Before the coming of the white men, Cherokees and other Indians of the Southeast enjoyed the flavor of yaupon tea and products derived from nut trees, including acorns, chestnuts, walnuts, and hickories.
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Record #:
3590
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Hikers sometimes can experience injuries along the trail. However, many injuries, like muscle strain, can be avoided by understanding that walking in the city and walking in the woods require different styles.
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Record #:
4691
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In downtown Franklin in Macon County stands a tall, grassy mound, about 20 feet high and 450 feet around the base. The Nikwasi Mound, built a thousand years ago by the Cherokees, was a sacred ceremonial site in the center of their village on the Little Tennessee River. Town residents purchased the mound in 1946 to preserve it. Today Nikwasi and the Town Creek Mound near Mount Gilead are the state's only two mounds that are protected and open to the public.
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