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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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9 results for Herring
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Record #:
4969
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The Cypress Grill is a beloved seafood restaurant in Jamesville that attracts people from in state and without. The grill is open just three months a year, mid-January to late-April, which corresponds to the herring run on the Roanoke and other eastern Carolina rivers. Herring is the grill's main draw.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 68 Issue 10, Mar 2001, p112-113, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
12914
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Addressing the method of herring net fishing, also known as herring-dipping, residents from Nova Scotia through Florida have enjoyed this pastime since learning the technique from Native Americans. Consumed in a variety of forms, herring are most numerous in the springtime, during spawning.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 28 Issue 25, May 1961, p8-9, 20, il
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Record #:
15663
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North Carolina has a number of state symbols--state bird, state flower, state song, etc. Arthur wants North Carolina to have a state fish--the herring--and he presents his arguments on its behalf.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 23 Issue 15, Dec 1955, p17, il
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Record #:
26341
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The North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission is conducting a project to assess if the introduction of river herring into Lake Phelps will have an effect on other fish populations.
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Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 22 Issue 3, Summer 1978, p15
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Record #:
9210
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River herring is a group composed collectively of two herring-like species--the alewife and the blueback. Although sports fishermen seek them in a few locations in the state, most river herring are taken commercially. Tyus discusses their importance, the cause of their decline, and what can be down to reverse their downward spiral.
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Record #:
5
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Stephenson discusses the factors surrounding the decline of herring runs throughout Eastern North Carolina.
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Record #:
5765
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Nickens discusses herring fishing in Eastern North Carolina and the Cypress Grill in Jamesville. The restaurant has been operated by Sally and Leslie Gardner for 27 of its 65-year history. The grill is open just three months a year, mid-January to late-April, which corresponds to the herring run on the river. The menu's main draw, herring, attracts people from in-state and without.
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Record #:
22613
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The Apalachia Reservoir is the first reservoir in North Carolina to be managed as a trophy trout fishery. In 2012 the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission stocked 5,000 trout (brown and rainbow). The stocks have continued to thrive as they take advantage of the presence of the invasive blueback herring.
Record #:
30901
Abstract:
From the 1800s until recently, commercial fisheries in eastern North Carolina provided herring to people throughout the country and abroad. In an attempt to replenish the herring population, on March 2, 2006, the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission voted to ban the harvest of herring in North Carolina waters for the next ten to fifteen years. This article covers the history and biology of the blueback herring, also known as the river herring.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 40 Issue 3, Mar 2008, p32-34, il, por Periodical Website
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