NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


8 results for Aquariums, Public
Currently viewing results 1 - 8
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
2076
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina's state aquariums at Pine Knoll Shores, Fort Fisher, and Roanoke Island are more than just a place to view marine life. Several programs, including marsh walks and on-board collecting cruises, are offered by the aquariums.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 61 Issue 12, May 1994, p30-31, 33, il
Full Text:
Record #:
2882
Author(s):
Abstract:
Located at Pine Knoll Shores, Roanoke Island, and Fort Fisher, the state's three public aquariums are observing their 20th anniversary in 1996. In 1995, over 1,000,000 people visited them.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 63 Issue 12, May 1996, p3
Full Text:
Record #:
5101
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina operates three public aquariums along the coast at Roanoke Island near Manteo, at Pine Knoll Shores near Atlantic Beach and at Fort Fisher, near Wilmington. This year the three are marking their twenty-fifth anniversaries.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 49 Issue 3, Summer 2001, p2-3
Subject(s):
Record #:
5818
Author(s):
Abstract:
The travel industry generates over $134 million in Pitt County each year. Since the Pitt/Greenville area has no natural attractions, like mountains and beaches, Bivins discusses what draws visitors to the area.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 61 Issue 5, May 2003, p38
Subject(s):
Record #:
7354
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 1976, North Carolina opened three Marine Resource Centers at Pine Knoll Shores, Roanoke Island, and Fort Fisher that were meant to enhance coastal and marine science and education for researchers, teachers, and the public. In 1986, the sites were renamed aquariums. In the late 1990s, the North Carolina General Assembly appropriated $15 million to each site for a complete makeover. Smith discusses the changes to the aquariums and takes readers through the \"staff only\" doors for a glimpse for what goes on behind the scenes at an aquarium.
Source:
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
8827
Author(s):
Abstract:
Remnants of the pound net, originally used by Croatan Indians and depicted in John White's drawings, can still be seen in North Carolina rivers of today. The pound nets of today are more sophisticated, but still lead fish into a trap and hold them there. A full size net is on display at the North Carolina Marine Resources Center on Roanoke Island.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 48 Issue 12, May 1981, p22-23, il
Full Text:
Record #:
2951
Author(s):
Abstract:
Located at Pine Knoll Shores, Fort Fisher, and Roanoke Island, the state's three public aquariums are twenty years old in 1996. A $30 million expansion and renovation program will double the size of each one.
Full Text:
Record #:
5805
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina operates three aquariums along the coast at Roanoke Island near Manteo, at Pine Knoll Shores near Atlantic Beach, and at Fort Fisher near Wilmington. Phillips discusses the attractions at each.
Subject(s):
Full Text: