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14 results for Barfield, Rodney
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Record #:
188
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The chanteys of the North Carolina menhaden fishermen, who worked the North Carolina coast in the 19th and 20th centuries, are reminiscent of old field-work songs and gospel songs, and their lyrics reflect the work, religion and loves of the men.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 59 Issue 10, Mar 1992, p25-26, por
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Record #:
199
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Bertie County native Parker D. Robbins was an African American landowner, inventor, builder, and craftsman during the late 19th-century.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 59 Issue 9, Feb 1992, p12-13, por
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Record #:
548
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The whaling industry on the Outer Banks is of historical interest for North Carolina.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 60 Issue 2, July 1992, p12-14, il
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Record #:
1369
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Sixty years of life on the Outer Banks have been preserved for us in the journal of John Rolinson, who noted shipwrecks, weather, economic history, and numerous other aspects of 19th-century life on the Banks.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 61 Issue 8, Jan 1994, p32-33, por
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Record #:
8822
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n 1830, there were fifty-six active gold mines in North Carolina, and the state was called the Golden State. Christopher Bechtler, Sr., moved to Rutherford County in 1830, and, in 1831, opened a currency mint. Bechtler died in 1842, but his mint continued stamping coins until the late 1850s. Many residents of Rutherford and surrounding counties have coins passed down through their families.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 48 Issue 12, May 1981, p8-11, il, por
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Record #:
9153
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The earliest documented gold found in North Carolina was a seventeen-pound nugget discovered in Cabarrus County in 1799. An eleven-year-old boy named Conrad Reed made the find, and the gold was valued at $3,600. Until 1825 when vein mining was introduced in North Carolina, most gold mining was haphazard and done by amateurs. By 1891, there were thirty-five active mines in the state, and the Reed Gold Mine in Cabarrus County is now a state historical site.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 48 Issue 11, Apr 1981, p8-10, il
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Record #:
12120
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Organized in 1932, the North Carolina Symphony was the first state-supported orchestra in the nation. Barfield highlights some of the symphony's accomplishments over its first fifty years.
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Record #:
16193
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Thomas Day was a free African American before the Civil War largely because of his natural skills, especially those related to furniture building. Born in Virginia, 1801, he apprenticed under a skilled craftsman. He ran a successful shop, which prospered between 1840 and 1850, and was also commissioned by Governor David S. Reid and the University of North Carolina Chapel Hill.
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Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 33 Issue 1, Fall 1993, p23-27, il
Record #:
16254
Author(s):
Abstract:
Julian Guthrie is a native of Harkers Island, a small island community east of Beaufort, N.C. It is a unique community known widely for its traditional boats and its coastal folkways. Guthrie is a boat builder who learned the techniques and traditions from his uncle, traditions that mark the boats from this community with a unique identity.
Record #:
16351
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Although many believe that nothing materially survived from Afro-American antebellum society, Barfield argues that not only free Blacks but also slaves produced a large amount of domestic tools and furnishings during the antebellum period. They also acquired and made pottery, utensils, glassware, Bibles, photographs, and other trinkets.
Record #:
16099
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Part II of the series looks at the state of African American affairs during and following the Civil War. Specifically he highlights the lives of James H. Harris, Parker D. Robbins, Charles N. Hunter, and Warren Coleman. Also highlighted are entrepreneurial, legislative, and social changes for the African American community including the North Carolina Colored Industrial Fair and the North Carolina Mutual Insurance Company.
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Record #:
16092
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From emancipation to the Civil Rights, the African American movement for equality was led by exceptional individuals. Highlighted are the lives of some of the most influential including; George Moses Horton, John Chavis, Henry Evans, and Lunsford Lane.
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Record #:
2177
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After the Civil War, the independent lifestyles of Outer Banks citizens began to change as business interests, such as commercial fishing, moved to the area in competition with traditional cottage industries, such as boat building and net making.
Source:
Tributaries (NoCar Ref VK 24 N8 T74), Vol. Issue 4, Oct 1994, p14-19, il
Record #:
21602
Author(s):
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An examination of the life and work of African American master cabinetmaker Thomas Day and his brother John Day, who were free, black craftsmen in the height of the antebellum period. Both skilled in furniture making, learned from their father, they established a business in Milton. John became a Baptist minister and relocated to Liberia, which he helped found. Thomas Day's furniture skills and the fact that he owned both land and slaves gave him a status that was unusual for free blacks in antebellum North Carolina. Thomas and his work reached a sort of mythic reputation in the state in the early 20th century and was glorified by whites who felt comfortable with his middle-class ethics and establishment loyalties.