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5 results for Day, Thomas, 1801-1861
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Record #:
3070
Author(s):
Abstract:
Thomas Day of Milton, a free African-American craftsman, handcrafted furniture during the 1840s and 1850s. His business, which employed twelve workers, included such clients as Governor David Reid and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 54 Issue 11, Nov 1996, p6, il
Record #:
4259
Author(s):
Abstract:
Born in Virginia in 1801, Thomas Day, a free African-American craftsman, created furniture that is much in demand today. In the 1820s he moved to Milton is Caswell County, where he established a cabinetmaking business that employed both blacks and whites and served a racially mixed clientele. Day died in 1861.
Source:
North Carolina Preservation (NoCar Oversize E 151 N6x), Vol. Issue 101, Summer/Fall 1996, p2-4, il
Record #:
4531
Author(s):
Abstract:
Born in Virginia in 1801, Thomas Day, a free African-American craftsman, came to Milton in 1825. He established a cabinetmaking business and created furniture that is as highly prized today as it was in its own time. He is considered the state's most famous cabinetmaker and furniture craftsman. That he survived and thrived in the early half of the 19th-century is even more remarkable. Among his clients were two governors and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 17 Issue 4, Jan 2000, p48-49, il Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
16193
Author(s):
Abstract:
Thomas Day was a free African American before the Civil War largely because of his natural skills, especially those related to furniture building. Born in Virginia, 1801, he apprenticed under a skilled craftsman. He ran a successful shop, which prospered between 1840 and 1850, and was also commissioned by Governor David S. Reid and the University of North Carolina Chapel Hill.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 33 Issue 1, Fall 1993, p23-27, il
Record #:
13481
Abstract:
In 1839, Thomas Day, the master cabinetmaker from Milton in Caswell County, acquired ten-year-old Archibald Clark as an apprentice. State law required that all orphans and children of unmarried parents be bound to a master or mistress through indenture to the age of twenty-one. Marshall describes what Archibald's life would have been like during his indenture period.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 50 Issue 1, Fall 2010, p20-23, il