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7 results for Bechtler, Christopher, 1782-1842
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Record #:
3112
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German immigrant Christopher Bechtler came to Rutherford County in 1830 to seek gold, but found another opportunity - minting gold coins. Between 1831 and 1840, he minted over $2 million of the much-needed medium of exchange.
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Record #:
7372
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The Bechtlers, Christopher, son Augustus, and nephew Christopher, Jr., German immigrants, arrived in New York in 1829. After a short stay in Philadelphia, they moved to Rutherford County in 1830. Experienced in making watches and jewelry, they saw that the economy was hindered because little gold was in circulation. Rutherford County at that time was the geographic center of gold mining in the nation, and the Bechtlers opened a mint, which operated from 1831 to 1840. Over $2 million in gold coins was minted and used during that period. The money boosted industry and helped people to buy and sell goods.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 4, Sept 2005, p130-132, 134, 1136, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
8822
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n 1830, there were fifty-six active gold mines in North Carolina, and the state was called the Golden State. Christopher Bechtler, Sr., moved to Rutherford County in 1830, and, in 1831, opened a currency mint. Bechtler died in 1842, but his mint continued stamping coins until the late 1850s. Many residents of Rutherford and surrounding counties have coins passed down through their families.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 48 Issue 12, May 1981, p8-11, il, por
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Record #:
9169
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The beginning of coinage in North Carolina is not entirely clear, but the first copper or brass pieces appeared in the late 17th century. In the early 19th century, coins began to disappear, and the market was inundated with tokens, paper, and other base metals. By 1834, North Carolina was back on the gold standard thanks to the Bechtlers of Rutherford County who minted the country's first gold dollar. North Carolinians began to be featured on currency, including Virginia Dare who appeared on the half-dollar in 1937, Governor Zebulon Vance, and the North Carolina Capitol Building.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 44 Issue 8, Jan 1977, p12-13, 60, il
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Record #:
14690
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Christopher and Augustus Bechtler emigrated from Germany to settle in Rutherford County in 1830. Both were metallurgists and were drawn to Rutherford because of the active gold mining in the region. By 1831, the Bechtler's were minting gold coins in $1, $2.50, and $5 denominations, a government approved endeavor at that time because of non-stringent federal laws. The Charlotte Mint was established in 1837 and by 1840 the Bechtler's had stopped their private coinage business.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 14 Issue 47, Apr 1947, p8, 19
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Record #:
4477
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The Bechtlers -- Christopher, son Augustus, and nephew Christopher, Jr., -- arrived in Rutherford County from Germany in 1830. Experienced metal workers, they saw that the economy was hindered because little gold was in circulation. Since Rutherford County at that time was the geographic center of gold mining in the nation, the Bechtlers opened a mint, which operated from 1831 to 1840. Over $2 million in gold was put into use during that period. The money boosted industry and helped people to buy and sell goods.
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Record #:
40420
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Among towns in Western North Carolina, Rutherfordton touts these famous firsts: post office, public school, and newspaper. The small town, population 4,000, also celebrates its rich history in a historic house turned bed and breakfast and a museum commemorating the work of Christopher Bechtler, credited as minting the first gold $1 coin in the region.
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