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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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4 results for Women--Suffrage
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Record #:
1616
Author(s):
Abstract:
Mary Hilliard Hinton was the leader of North Carolina's anti-suffrage movement. The movement was successful in the state, but the Nineteenth Amendment to the Constitution was eventually ratified, thereby undermining this success.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 33 Issue 2, Spring 1994, p23-27, il, por
Record #:
1613
Author(s):
Abstract:
Gertrude Weil, member of a wealthy Goldsboro family, was president of North Carolina's Equal Suffrage League in 1920.
Source:
Record #:
17406
Abstract:
The 1920 General election was the first time North Carolina women were allowed to vote. Mr. McGalliard recounts the history of women's suffrage in North Carolina, other legal activities women were barred from, and the \"reasoning\" for keeping women away from the ballot booth.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 4 Issue 1, Oct 1936, p17-18
Subject(s):
Record #:
17508
Author(s):
Abstract:
Despite the 19th Amendment, the question of women's suitability to serve as members of juries remained undecided across much of the country. North Carolina Attorney General for 1937 reviews precedence for women serving on juries and the case presented both for and against but ultimately decided that women should be treated as full citizens and be allowed to serve on juries.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 5 Issue 1, Oct 1937, p1-2, 17, por
Subject(s):