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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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13 results for Folk singers
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Record #:
60
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Abstract:
Luster introduces the African-American chanteymen of the Menhaden fish pulls.
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Record #:
2639
Author(s):
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Before hydraulic net-pullers came into use in the 1950s, menhaden fishermen working the state's coasts synchronized their net work by chanty singing.
Source:
NC Arts (NoCar Oversize NX 1 N22x), Vol. 6 Issue 1, Spring 1990, p1-3, il
Record #:
5586
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Menhaden Chantymen of Beaufort and Carteret Counties sing chanteys that reflect the work, religion, and loves of the men and are also reminiscent of the old field-work songs. In 1991, the group received a N.C. Folk Heritage Award.
Record #:
12784
Author(s):
Abstract:
Tennessee native and authentic folk singer, Frank Noah Proffitt was discovered by Frank Warner in 1938. Appearing at the Chicago University Folk Festival in 1961, as well as at the Folk Music Week in Massachusetts, Proffitt has been featured in Time Magazine. Having recorded three albums, Proffitt augments his musician's salary through the production of fretless banjos and dulcimers, all of which are constructed from native hardwoods.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 30 Issue 22, Mar 1963, p15, 26, por
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Record #:
23062
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Born and raised in Catawba County, musician Steph Stewart left North Carolina in quest of a music career. After returning to live in Carrboro, she met Bassist Nick Vandenberg, guitarist Mario Arnez, and fiddler Omar Ruiz-Lopez. The four formed a folk band and have since released two records.
Source:
Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 32 Issue 21, May 2015, p20, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
35304
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The history of Shepherd M. Dugger, who was a folklorist, poet, author, and schoolteacher, amongst other things. He wrote fondly of the region of Banner Elk, also known by its Native American Name, Ottarary.
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Record #:
35295
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The author writes a eulogy and highlighted biography of a teacher and traditional folk singer in North Carolina.
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Record #:
35297
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Uncle Pay Fry was a local folksinger in Yadkin County. He contributed an entire ballad collection to the “Frank C. Brown Folklore Collection.” The ballads “The Suffolk Miracle,” “The Seventh King’s Daughter,” and “Young Johnny” are included in the article.
Record #:
35673
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Horton Barker, a folk singer from Virginia, interviewed with the author about his life and folk singing. Several manuscripts came from the interaction, and the ballads are written out at the end of the article.
Record #:
35744
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The author transcribed several songs that Mr. Lunsford performed.
Record #:
35839
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Bobby McMillon is a folk singer and a story and riddle teller in Appalachian North Carolina. Exposed to folk traditions growing up, McMillon became interested in folk music at a young age.
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Record #:
35963
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For more than 50 years, Archie Green made North Carolina a special focus for much of the political-cultural work he chose to do in his quest to comprehend the lives of ordinary people, and to gain appropriate recognition for their expressive culture.
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Record #:
35964
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Abstract:
To Bessie Eldreth, music was a cultural and family legacy that tied her to the past and told her who she was. It was also a legacy to which she added liberally, so that her repertoire memorialized her particular passage through eighty years of the twentieth century.
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